Nghidinwa pleads for mechanisms to root out GBV

The Minister of Gender Equality and Child Welfare has called on politicians, High Commissioners and leaders of Civil Society Organisations (CSO) to come up with mechanisms that should be employed to root out Gender Based Violence (GBV) in the country.

Rosalia Nghidinwa made the call at a consultative dinner with Members of Parliament (MP) Women High Commissioners in the country and leaders of CSO´s held at the Hilton Hotel on Monday.

The ministers call also comes in the wake in which local media reported that five young women were found raped and murdered in a mere period of just four weeks.

¨These senseless killings have sparked fear among women and children and thus critically highlights the ongoing issue of GBV,¨ said Nghidinwa.

Nghidinwa further called on the gathering to come up with best traditional practices and norms as opposed to negative modern influences, in order to keep a healthy and violence-free nation.

The minister then pointed out that Vision 2030 will not be achieved in a society where Gender Based Violence (GBV) is escalating mainly against women and children adding that with no women, there will be no future generation.

¨The Namibian Constitution is loud and clear in Article 6, where it speaks about the protection of life. The entire nation including stake holders must stand together to fight this evil of the raping and killing of women and baby dumping, facing the society today,¨ she said.

Nghidinwa also indicated that her ministry has carried various programmes and activities to tackle GBV such as the first ever National Conference which was held in 2007 as well as a Zero Tolerance for GBV Campaign which was launched in 2009.

However, despite all these efforts, the minister said GBV continues to increase on a daily basis especially against women and children.

¨This evil of GBV is evident in the statistics of cases reported since 2007. In 2007 12, 270 were reported whilst in 2008, 12, 324 cases were reported. In 2009 the number reduced to 11, 765 and went slightly up in 2010 with 11, 770,¨ she said.

GBV cases were the highest in 2011 with 14, 405 cases followed by 2012 with 13, 275 cases.

The minister explained that the cases range from indecent assaults, attempted rape, rape, grievous bodily harm and murder.

In a study conducted by the Namibian government in collaboration with United Nation organisations such as the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) found that 40.5 per cent of females have experienced physical violence compared to their male counterparts experiencing physical violence of 27.6 per cent.

¨This study indicated that there are also men who are experiencing domestic violence,¨ the minister of gender equality and child welfare said.

The study also found unemployment and poverty to be some of the reasons behind GBV and that violence happens because of discrimination against women.

Other reasons are that, in some communities, physical violence and emotional pressure is regarded as normal, thus families are not suppose to disclose what happens in their homes.

The study also found that women have no equal participation in the country´s economy and this leads to them economically depended on men for sustainability.

(edited)WINDHOEK: The Minister of Gender Equality and Child Welfare has called on politicians, High Commissioners and leaders of Civil Society Organisations (CSO) to come up with mechanisms which should be employed to root out Gender-Based Violence (GBV) in the country.

Rosalia Nghidinwa made the call at a consultative dinner with Members of Parliament (MPs),female High Commissioners in the country and leaders of CSOs at a local hotel on Monday.

The minister’s call also comes in the wake of local media reports that five young women were found raped and murdered in a period of just four weeks.

“These senseless killings have sparked fear among women and children, and thus critically highlights the ongoing issue of GBV”, said Nghidinwa.

She further called on the gathering to come up with the best traditional practices and norms, as opposed to negative modern influences in order to maintain a healthy and violence-free nation.

Vision 2030 will not be achieved in a society where GBV is escalating, mainly against women and children, she said, adding that with no women, there would be no future generations.

¨The Namibian Constitution is loud and clear in Article 6, where it speaks about the protection of life. The entire nation, including stakeholders, must stand together to fight this evil of the raping and killing of women and baby dumping facing society today”, she noted.

Nghidinwa also indicated that her ministry has carried out various programmes and activities to tackle GBV, such as the first-ever national conference held in 2007, as well as a ‘Zero Tolerance for GBV campaign’, which was launched in 2009.

Despite all these efforts, GBV continues to increase on a daily basis, especially against women and children.

“This evil of GBV is evident in the statistics of cases reported since 2007. In 2007, 12 270 were reported whilst in 2008, 12 324 cases were reported.

In 2009, the number reduced to 11 765, and went slightly up in 2010 with 11 770”, she explained.

GBV cases were the highest in 2011 with 14 405 cases, followed by 2012 with 13 275 cases.

These cases range from indecent assaults, attempted rape, rape, assault with the intent to cause grievous bodily harm, and murder.

Meanwhile, a study conducted by the Namibian Government in collaboration with United Nations’ organisations such as the United Nations’ Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations’ Population Fund (UNFPA) found that 40.5 per cent of females had experienced physical violence, compared to their male counterparts experiencing physical violence at 27.6 per cent.

“This study indicated that there are also men who are experiencing domestic violence”,Nghidinwa stated.

The study also found unemployment and poverty to be some of the reasons behind GBV, and that violence happens because of discrimination against women.

Other reasons are that in some communities, physical violence and emotional pressure is regarded as normal. Thus, families are not supposed to disclose what happens in their homes.

The study also found that women have no equal participation in the country´s economy, and this leads to them being economically dependent on men for sustainability.