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Aspirin linked to macular degeneration in study

Researchers at Sydney University found that the longer one took aspirin the greater the chance of losing one's vision to macular degeneration.

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A new study has shown that taking aspirin in the long-term could lead to age-related macular degeneration. (Stephen Chernin/Getty Images)

A new study has shown that taking aspirin in the long-term could lead to age-related macular degeneration.

Researchers at Sydney University found that the longer one took aspirin the greater the chance of losing one's vision to the disease.

“The cumulative incidence of neovascular [age-related macular degeneration] among regular aspirin users was 0.8% at 5 years, 1.6% at 10 years and 3.7% at 15 years; among regular aspirin users, the cumulative incidence was 1.9% at 5 years and 9.3% at 15 years, respectively,” the investigators wrote, according to Cardiology Today

“Regular aspirin use was significantly associated with an increased incidence of neovascular [age-related macular degeneration].”

The Australian researchers used data on 2,400 middle-aged and elderly people over 15 years, reported the Telegraph.

All of them used Aspirin but at various intervals.

Researchers say the evidence is not strong but statistically significant.

That said, people taking aspirin regularly should not change their routine.

"Currently, there is insufficient evidence to recommend changing clinical practice, except perhaps in cases of patients with strong risk factors for age-related macular degeneration, such as existing age-related macular degeneration in one eye," the authors said, reported HealthDay.

Aspirin is taken by millions around the world to prevent heart attacks, strokes and cancer.

The findings were published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/health/130121/aspirin-linked-macular-degeneration-study