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Mali: African leaders meet to plan intervention on Mali crisis

The meeting comes at the heels of a United Nations Security Council resolution last week that gives leaders 45 days to make a plan to recover the territory, which was lost last summer.

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Mali's Prime Minister Cheikh Modibo Diarra leaves after a meeting with France's Foreign minister Laurent Fabius on September 20, 2012 in Paris (Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images)

With the Mali crisis deepening, African leaders met Friday to discuss ways in which to take back the country's northern half from Al Qaeda-linked militants.

The meeting comes at the heels of a United Nations Security Council resolution last week that gives leaders 45 days to make a plan to recover the territory, which was lost last summer.

The Associated Press reported that France, Britain and the United States said that it would offer logistical support to African troops during an invasion.

France has been particularly vocal about intervention to oust the militants with whom six of its nationals are being held hostage.

The delegates drafted a document that calls on the African Union and other countries to supply Mali with weapons and expertise.

The Associated Press said that the document was short on details regarding the timetable or how the intervention will be carried out.

More from GlobalPostIn Mali, Al Qaeda now controls an area the size of France

"Any military action must also support a coherent political strategy for the country's reunification. And for the international community to back an international military force, human rights and humanitarian law must be scrupulously respected," said Jan Eliasson, the UN deputy secretary-general, according to the UN News Centre.

During the meeting African leaders pressed for a timely intervention, noting the abuses carried out by the region's new rulers.

GlobalPost has previously reported on the deepening crisis in Mali, which was largely fueled by weapons from Libya during that country's civil war.

Islamic militants have imposed Sharia law on the region (which is the size of France) and carries out brutal justice on the local population, including public floggings and amputations.

Al Jazeera reported that Malians are looking at the recent developments with hope and fear.

"People here in Mali are watching these moves with a mixture of hope and fear. Hope to see their nation reunified. And fear that foreign military intervention could turn their country into another Afghanistan," said the channel's correspondent in Bamako, Mohamed Vall.

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/africa/121020/mali-african-leaders-meet-plan-intervention-mali-crisis