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Poll: Romney's Mormonism won't impact 2012 election

Mormonism not familiar to most Americans, but won't impact their vote in 2012 election, according to poll.

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Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney shakes hands with people during a campaign event. Romney will have to have to find a way to manage voters' demands with the demands of his faith. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Most Americans aren't familiar with Mitt Romney's religion, but a new poll shows it won't likely impact their vote in the 2012 election.

Sixty percent of voters are aware that the former Massachusetts governor is a Mormon, but 81 percent say it doesn't matter to them, according to the poll released Thursday by the Pew Research Center.

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The survey did find widespread misgivings about the Mormon faith.

Nearly two-thirds of non-Mormons see Romney’s faith as very different from their own, and just half of those surveyed consider it a Christian religion, according to The Associated Press.

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But those who know Romney is a devout Mormon are OK with his faith nonetheless, according to the poll.

Less than 50 percent of those surveyed, meanwhile, believe President Barack Obama is a Christian. The rest either don't know his faith or believe he is Muslim, USA Today reported.

"Fewer say Obama is Christian -- and more say he is Muslim -- than did so in October 2008, near the end of the last presidential campaign," Pew stated. "The increase since 2008 is particularly concentrated among conservative Republicans, about a third of whom (34 percent) describe the president as a Muslim."

Overall, 45 percent of voters are comfortable with Obama's religion, 5 percent say it does not matter and 19 percent are uncomfortable, Reuters reported.

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/americas/united-states/120726/poll-romney-mormonism-wont-impact-2012-election