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Rebekah Brooks ties David Cameron more closely to News Corp.

Rebekah Brooks, a former newspaper editor and News Corp. executive, has said that Prime Minister David Cameron commiserated with her after she quit in the wake of the phone hacking scandal.

Rebekah brooks 2012 02 28Enlarge
Rebekah Brooks, former chief executive of News International, arrives at Newbury racecourse in November. (Alan Crowhurst/Getty Images)

Rebekah Brooks, a former newspaper editor and News Corp. executive, has said that Prime Minister David Cameron commiserated with her after she quit in the wake of the phone hacking scandal.

Brooks, 43, a former editor of two Murdoch tabloids — The Sun and the now-defunct News of The World — has twice been arrested and questioned by police about illegal eavesdropping and obstruction of justice.

Brooks, giving evidence at the Leveson Inquiry into media ethics in London, also spoke of frequent contacts with Cameron in the run-up to the 2010 election, CNN reported.

In six hours of questioning, Brooks also told of joining in Christmas parties, private dinners and hotel lunches with the country's most powerful political leaders in an effort to lobby the British government over a planned News Corp. takeover deal of BSkyB, according to the Associated Press.

Brooks told Lord Justice Leveson that she exchanged up to two texts per week with David Cameron during the 2010 general election campaign, the Guardian wrote, adding that Cameron signed off texts with "DC" or sometimes "LOL."

However, Brooks clarified, LOL stood for "laugh out loud", not "lots of love".

She dismissed as "ludicrous" reports that they exchanged texts up to 12 times a week.

However, she confirmed that she was at a Boxing Day party with Cameron in December 2010, and three days earlier hosted the prime minister at her Oxfordshire home where, over dinner, News Corp.'s bid for BSkyB was discussed.

Brooks, who rose quickly from being junior employee at News Corp. to one of its top operatives, said Cameron — her neighbor in the picturesque Cotswolds area of southern England — was a personal friend.

GlobalPost reports: Andy Coulson 'assured' David Cameron he knew nothing about News Corp. phone hacking

According to CNN, a message of commiseration from the prime minister when she resigned from News International last summer, along the lines of "keep your head up," was among a number of "indirect messages" of sympathy that top politicians had sent to her.

"I received some indirect messages from No. 10, No. 11, the Home Office and Foreign Office," Brooks said, referring to Cameron, Treasury chief George Osborne and other leading Cabinet members.

She agreed with inquiry lawyer Robert Jay that a message from Cameron had told her to "keep your head up" and expressed regret that he could not offer more support publicly because of political pressure.

The message was "along those lines, I don't think they were the exact words," Brooks said.

Brooks resigned as chief executive of News International, the British arm of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., in July amid public outrage over claims of widespread hacking by staff at its News of the World newspaper.

She has not been charged with any offense, but is currently on bail pending further investigations — so jay did not question her directly about phone hacking allegations.

The BBC called Brooks' choice outfit for her appearance — a dark blue dress with white collar and cuffs — as "demure."

It had also been described as "Puritan chic" and the "Salem" look.

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http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/europe/united-kingdom/120511/rebekah-brooks-news-corp-david-cameron-phone-hack