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Reuters Health News Summary

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Following is a summary of current health news briefs.

Creditors probe meningitis-linked pharmacy owners' pay

BOSTON (Reuters) - Creditors of the bankrupt pharmacy linked to a deadly U.S. meningitis outbreak are investigating $16 million in salary and shareholder distributions made to company owners in 2012, a lawyer for the group said on Tuesday. Some of the transfers from the New England Compounding Center, which had 2012 sales of $32.4 million, followed the discovery last fall of the meningitis outbreak that has killed 44 people, according to documents filed late on Friday.

J&J mulls sale of diagnostics unit

2013-01-22T193538Z_8_BRE90L0H6_RTROPTC_0_US-JJ-RESULTS.XML () -

U.S. top court rejects hospitals' Medicare claims suit 2013-01-22T214130Z_2_BRE90L0ZG_RTROPTC_0_US-USA-COURT-MEDICARE. XML () -

Limited impact on child abuse from visits, intervention: study

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Celgene's Abraxane increases survival in pancreatic cancer 2013-01-22T230104Z_1_BRE90L14P_RTROPTC_0_US-CELGENE-CANCER.XML () -

Lilly stomach cancer drug extends survival vs placebo 2013-01-23T022455Z_1_BRE90M04F_RTROPTC_0_US-LILLY-CANCER.XML () -

Allergan aims to widen migraine treatment with MAP Pharma buy 2013-01-23T031422Z_3_BRE90M03C_RTROPTC_0_US-MAPPHARMA-ALLERGEN. XML () -

Poor U.S. hospitals likeliest to pay readmission fine

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Large teaching hospitals and hospitals that primarily provide care to poor and uninsured patients are most likely to lose federal money under the U.S. government's plan to improve quality by tying payments to readmissions, according to new research. "The concern has been raised that when these penalties did come out, they would unfairly target the hospitals that treat the poorest and most complex patients," said Dr. Karen Joynt, the study's lead author from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

Platelets, steroids may not aid tennis elbow

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Over a few months, neither steroids nor platelet injections are any better than injections of inactive salt water when it comes to treating tennis elbow, according to new research. Despite its name, tennis elbow - which is caused by overuse of tendons in the elbow - often affects people with strenuous jobs, not just athletes.

Melamine tableware may leach chemical: study

2013-01-23T023557Z_1_BRE90M04I_RTROPTC_0_US-MELAMINE.XML () -

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