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Legal counsel on anchoring ban just detail for Scott

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(Globalpost/GlobalPost)

By Mark Lamport-Stokes

DUBLIN, Ohio (Reuters) - Attention to detail helped Adam Scott clinch his first major title at last month's Masters and the Australian is adopting the same strategy as he grapples with the implications of the 2016 ban on anchored putting.

Golf's governing bodies announced the widely expected ban on May 21 after players anchoring long putters had won four of the last six major championships, with Scott the most recent.

The European Tour expressed its support for the idea but both the U.S. PGA Tour and PGA of America voiced opposition and Scott is among at least three players who have consulted lawyers while the U.S. circuit ponders its official response.

"My intention is just to get all the information given to me possible from the PGA Tour, and for me, like anyone else in a business, to have some professional guidance on this issue," Scott said on Wednesday. "That's all it is."

"I don't think I have the ability to get that or ask the right questions. I'm not a lawyer. That's not my area of expertise, so I just want to get that information and make sure that my views are expressed to the Tour and that's that.

"There's no intention of filing suit or making problems. But this is a business and I'm treating it professionally and I have professional counsel to do that. Just like I'm sure the Tour has professional counsel when they make decisions about things."

JOYOUS CELEBRATIONS

Scott, who uses a broomstick putter anchored to his chest, says his life has changed very little since he sparked joyous celebrations in his homeland after becoming the first Australian to win the Masters with a playoff victory over Angel Cabrera.

"It's more demanding (media-wise) when I come to a golf tournament, but other than that there's no difference, "the 32-year-old told reporters at Muirfield Village Golf Club while preparing for Thursday's opening round at the Memorial Tournament.

"I've been home a lot enjoying some time there and getting some practice done, but other than that it's just been quite a nice few weeks. It doesn't get old being congratulated for winning the Masters."

With the year's second major, the U.S. Open, being played at Merion Golf Club in Ardmore, Pennsylvania in two weeks' time, Scott hopes to make the most of his competitive play this week at Muirfield Village where the rough is up after recent rain.

"Generally I put my schedule on courses I like to start with; that's the first thing that I'm going to go there (Merion) with a good attitude and this is a good golf course," the Australian said of Muirfield Village which shares a few similar characteristics with Merion.

"There are some unique courses, but the rough here is something that I think is really good preparation (for Merion), although you don't want to miss too many greens here this week.

"It's the first time this year we've been in grass like this, rough like this. Having a week of playing out of it here can certainly just get you set for what you're in for going to Merion."

Scott, who has already played two practice rounds at Merion, is scheduled to tee off in the company of South Africans Ernie Els and Charl Schwartzel in Thursday's opening round at Muirfield Village.

"The course sets up well for me and my game is in good shape," said Scott. "I'll be looking to take advantage of that trying to put myself in position over the weekend."

(Reporting by Mark Lamport-Stokes; Editing by Frank Pingue)

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/thomson-reuters/130529/legal-counsel-anchoring-ban-just-detail-scott