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Europe is changing. Here's how. A reported blog.

In Europe, migration history repeats itself

Back in the days of empire have-nots used to head out to the colonies. Guess what? They are doing it again. Although the colonies are now independent, prosperous nations
Euro emigrationEnlarge
If you were a young unemployed Portuguese person moving to Rio in the former colony of Brazil must seem like a no-brainer (ANTONIO SCORZA/AFP/Getty Images)

With the euro zone peripheral countries experiencing the worst economy since the great depression - and with younger workers finding it virtually impossible to find a job, people are lighting out for the territories - and former colonies of their countries.

Young Portuguese are particularly lucky as their former colony Brazil is booming and seems like a pretty terrific place to be young. Another former colony, Angola, is poised to become a major oil exporter. Times are super good there.

Spanish and Italian youngsters are heading for Argentina. Buenos Aires has a large population of Italian descent there and the language is no barrier for the Spanish kids.

For the Irish and the Greeks, Australia is beckoning. Admittedly the two nations didn't have modern empires. But many of Australia's first settlers were Irish - transported criminals and political activists. There was a huge wave of Greek immigration to Australia just after WW 2. A lot of young Greeks have family in Melbourne and other parts of Oz.

I confess, I have even thought of Australia - so long as China is in need of Australian natural resources the country is going to be economically vibrant ... and Chinese need seems to be boundless.

The Guardian has a massive series on the phenomenon here.
 

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/europa/europe-emigration-history-repeats-itself