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'Lil Bub,' Internet cat sensation, wins over Tribeca Film Fest (VIDEOS)

Lil Bub, one of the Internet's favorite cats, is the focus of Vice's award-winning documentary 'Lil Bub & Friendz.'
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Meet Lil Bub, the Internet's new favorite cat. (Facebook)

Internet cat culture, meet Tribeca Film Fest. 

"Lil Bub & Friendz," the Vice Media documentary directed by Andy Capper and Juliette Eisner, premiered at the fest on Thursday, and has scooped up the Best Feature Film prize at Tribeca's Online Festival. 

Lil Bub is one of the Internet's biggest feline darlings: born as the runt of her litter with a rare congenital condition, her bulging eyes, too-short limbs, and permanently stuck-out tongue make her instantly, awkwardly loveable.  

More from GlobalPost: Best cat photo of 2012, guaranteed

"She makes it okay to be different, you know," Lil Bub's owner Michael Bridavsky told Fox News. "She’s a different looking cat, but at the same time it’s endearing and people can relate to that. Different is good."

The documentary follows Lil Bub's rise to Internet fame, including her stop at the first annual Cat Video Film Festival in Minneapolis, where she mingled with fellow cat stars Henri le Chat, Keyboard Cat, Spaghetti Cat, Nyan Cat and the Cat That Meows Like A Goat.

She has also met Robert DeNiro...no big deal. 

“No one cares about Bart Simpson anymore,” Ben Lashes, a “meme manager” who helps Internet celebrities gain traction in the real world, said in the documentary, the New York Times reported. ”This is it. This is popular culture.”

Welcome to the future, everyone. 

Here, the film's official trailer: 

And some of Lil Bub's finer moments: 

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/hollyworld/lil-bub-internet-cat-sensation-wins-tribeca-film-fest

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