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Taylor Swift school contest hijacked by internet trolls

Horace Mann School for the Deaf leading candidate to host Taylor Swift concert.
Taylor swift 2Enlarge
Taylor Swift, who is dating Robert F. Kennedy Jr.'s son Conor, 18, has bought a house in Cape Cod. (Isaac Brekken/AFP/Getty Images)

Taylor Swift faces a dilemma.

She running a contest with a few important sponsors in which she will perform for one lucky school this fall.

All students have to do is vote online through the contest’s Facebook page.

Even more, textbook rental company Chegg is donating $10,000 each to the top five schools.

But there’s a catch.

Fresh from a successful campaign in which a couple of merry pranksters convinced internet voters to send rapper Pitbull to remotest Alaska, Reddit and 4Chan are getting into the act, The Atlantic reported.

More from GlobalPost: Swift buys $4.9-million house across from Kennedys

The websites have combined in an effort to stuff the ballot box for one particular school, the Horace Mann School for the Deaf in Boston.

Think about that for a second.

OK, we’ll continue.

It’s working, with Horace Mann garnering more than 25,000 votes early this afternoon.

While there’s no leaderboard, schools such as Arizona State had yet to reach 3,000 votes, Mashable.com said.

Swift and the contest sponsors could ignore this altogether, with several clever rules designed to give the country music superstar an out based on scheduling conflicts.

That, of course, would paint her as insensitive and callous.

After all, when Pitbull learned he was headed to Alaska to play at Walmart’s most remote location, he embraced the challenge and suggested he’d travel anywhere to play for his fans.

Swift’s campus contest closes on Sept. 23.

More from GlobalPost: Swift crashes wedding, upsets Kennedys

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/hollyworld/taylor-swift-school-contest-hijacked-internet-trolls

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