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Goldman Sachs: Matt Taibbi strikes again

What could be worse than a "vampire squid, wrapped around the face of humanity?"
Goldman protestsEnlarge
Demonstrators from Code Pink for Peace hold photographs of Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and CEO of The Goldman Sachs Group, and demand he be jailed with other executives before a hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Investigations Subcommittee on Capitol Hill on April 27, 2010 in Washington, DC. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

In a July 2009 Rolling Stone magazine article titled "The Great American Bubble Machine," Matt Taibbi conjured the following sentence, a masterpiece of bad boy business reporting vitriol:

"The first thing you need to know about Goldman Sachs is that it's everywhere. The world's most powerful investment bank is a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money."

No. This was not a glowing portrait of the powerful investment bank.

Taibbi's screaming thesis was that Goldman represents all that is wrong with the current state of capitalism and democracy in America:

If America is circling the drain, Goldman Sachs has found a way to be that drain — an extremely unfortunate loophole in the system of Western democratic capitalism, which never foresaw that in a society governed passively by free markets and free elections, organized greed always defeats disorganized democracy. The bank's unprecedented reach and power have enabled it to turn all of America into a giant pump-and-dump scam, manipulating whole economic sectors for years at a time, moving the dice game as this or that market collapses, and all the time gorging itself on the unseen costs that are breaking families everywhere — high gas prices, rising consumer credit rates, half-eaten pension funds, mass layoffs, future taxes to pay off bailouts. All that money that you're losing, it's going somewhere, and in both a literal and a figurative sense, Goldman Sachs is where it's going: The bank is a huge, highly sophisticated engine for converting the useful, deployed wealth of society into the least useful, most wasteful and insoluble substance on Earth — pure profit for rich individuals.

Well, look out, Wall Street: Taibbi is back.

His latest Goldman takedown, called The People vs. Goldman Sachs, has just hit the web (the story will also appear in the May 26th print version of Rolling Stone).

In it, Taibbi says it's time for Goldman, "the great and powerful Oz of Wall Street," to stand trial, thanks to evidence compiled in a 650-page report by the Senate Subcommittee on Investigations chaired by Democrat Carl Levin of Michigan and Republican Tom Coburn of Oklahoma.

Here's how it starts:

They weren't murderers or anything; they had merely stolen more money than most people can rationally conceive of, from their own customers, in a few blinks of an eye. But then they went one step further. They came to Washington, took an oath before Congress, and lied about it.

Thanks to an extraordinary investigative effort by a Senate subcommittee that unilaterally decided to take up the burden the criminal justice system has repeatedly refused to shoulder, we now know exactly what Goldman Sachs executives like Lloyd Blankfein and Daniel Sparks lied about. We know exactly how they and other top Goldman executives, including David Viniar and Thomas Montag, defrauded their clients. America has been waiting for a case to bring against Wall Street. Here it is, and the evidence has been gift-wrapped and left at the doorstep of federal prosecutors, evidence that doesn't leave much doubt: Goldman Sachs should stand trial.

And, like his 2009 piece, Taibbi goes, yet again, for the literary jugular:

Defenders of Goldman have been quick to insist that while the bank may have had a few ethical slips here and there, its only real offense was being too good at making money. We now know, unequivocally, that this is bullshit. Goldman isn't a pudgy housewife who broke her diet with a few Nilla Wafers between meals — it's an advanced-stage, 1,100-pound medical emergency who hasn't left his apartment in six years, and is found by paramedics buried up to his eyes in cupcake wrappers and pizza boxes. If the evidence in the Levin report is ignored, then Goldman will have achieved a kind of corrupt-enterprise nirvana. Caught, but still free: above the law.

Who said business news was dull?

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/macro/goldman-sachs-matt-taibi-rolling-stone