Connect to share and comment

A reported blog on happenings around Latin America.

Scientists discover oldest whale fossil in Antarctica

Discovery could suggest that whales evolved more quickly into totally aquatic creatures than previously thought.
Hundreds of whale sharks meet on the mexican coast   globalpostEnlarge
A whale shark, nearly six meters long, swims near the surface of the plankton-rich water of Donsol town, on May 24, 2007. (Scott Tuason/AFP/Getty Images)

A fossil from an ancient whale found in Antarctica may be the oldest fully aquatic whale yet found.

Swedish and Argentine scientists said the jawbone dates back 49 million years, according to Clarin.

A scientist not involved in the find said it could suggest that whales evolved much more quickly from their amphibious precursors than previously thought, reports the Associated Press.

Earlier proto-whales lived on both the land and in the sea.

"The relevance of this discovery is that it's the oldest known completely aquatic whale found yet," said Marcelo Reguero, who leads research for the Argentine Antarctic Institute.

Follow Stephanie on Twitter: @stephaniegarlow

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/que-pasa/scientists-discover-oldest-whale-fossil-antarctica

.

Featured Slideshow

Women in combat, at home and abroad (PHOTOS)

On the news that Defense Secretary Leon Panetta's lifted the military ban on women in combat, GlobalPost took a look at women's wartime roles around the world.