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Wang vs. Weiner: the art of a Twitter scandal (VIDEO)

Wang Gongquan announced via China's version of Twitter, Sina Weibo, that he's leaving his wife for his mistress.
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Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-NY) admits to sending a lewd Twitter photo of himself to a woman and then lying about it during a press conference. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Unlike our fellow American, Anthony Weiner, bigwigs in China know how to cut right to the heart of a scandal.

Why waste a couple weeks lying about sending pictures of your crotch, when you can simply post a message online detailing the full extent of all your dark and stormy feelings?

Wang Gongquan — yes, A. Weiner, that's Mr. Wang to you — one of China's most famous investors, did just that.

He announced to his wife and family — as well as the rest of humantiy —  on China's version of Twitter, Sina Weibo, that he was leaving his wife for his mistress.

"I am giving up everything and eloping with Wang Qin," Wang posted on Sina Weibo. "I feel ashamed and so am leaving without saying goodbye. I kneel down and beg forgiveness!" reports the Wall Street Journal.

Hi confession on May 16 went viral and was republished about 60,000 times within 24 hours.

But Wang didn't stop there. In dozens of subsequent posts, Wang detailed his feelings on life and love and the occasional political musing. On May 30, he pointed his readers to a YouTube video of himself singing, "Ode to Elopement," a song he had written.

Thank you, New York magazine for translating the lyrics:

Always facing the whispers of the wind with a heart longing for love/
I loathe nothing more than laboring for profane achievements/
Who has ever seen mountains of gold and silver/
last through 10,000 generations?/
Throughout the ages,/
the only precious thing is this feeling.

Business Insider points out that that isn't the first time that a Chinese financier has taken his passions out online.

"Earlier this year, in an extremely explicit online tirade, DangDang CEO Li Guoqing [DangDang is like Amazon in China] let the world know how he felt about Morgan Stanley after it priced his company for a 50% pop on the day of its IPO. Li descibed Morgan Stanley bankers as 'little rats' and says 'let me **** all of you up after this drama is over.'"

And here we were worred about middle-schoolers who had't yet learned the consequences of what they put on Facebook.

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/the-rice-bowl/china-economy-internet-wang-gongquan-anthony-weiner-sina-weibo-twitter-scandal