Bunker promoted as a safe place to stay during the apocalypse is sick of media attention (VIDEO)

BARSTOW, CA - AUGUST 05:  Lightning strikes on August 5, 2005 southwest of Barstow, California. Heavy thunderstorms which could cause flash floods and spark wildfires are predicted for southern California's mountain and desert regions this weekend. Record rainfall over the winter has resulted in a heavy growth of natural vegetation which is now being dried out by triple-digit summer temperatures, and could prove to be dangerously thick fuel for huge wildfires this season. Many fear a repeat of the devastating historic fire season of 2003.</p>

BARSTOW, CA - AUGUST 05: Lightning strikes on August 5, 2005 southwest of Barstow, California. Heavy thunderstorms which could cause flash floods and spark wildfires are predicted for southern California's mountain and desert regions this weekend. Record rainfall over the winter has resulted in a heavy growth of natural vegetation which is now being dried out by triple-digit summer temperatures, and could prove to be dangerously thick fuel for huge wildfires this season. Many fear a repeat of the devastating historic fire season of 2003.

The Vivos Bunker had promoted itself as safe place to stay when the world ends. The location had been kept secret from people who weren't paying customers. But Vivos Project officials are worried now that outsiders will try to trespass. After two years of receiving heavy publicity,Vivos Project officials have decided to no longer let media take tours of the bunker, the Desert Dispatch reported.  

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“The site was ultimately compromised by several media, leading to high levels of local awareness of the shelter,” Vivos Project spokesman Barbi Grossman told the Dispatch in an email. “Rumors circulated through the Internet with attempts to pinpoint the exact shelter location.”

The shelter was founded by timeshare real estate salesman Robert Vicino. In a 2010 Los Angeles Times article, Vicino explained the business model: for $5,000, adults get a safe place to stay in the 13,000-square-foot underground shelter in the desert near Barstow. Kids cost $2,500 and pets are free. The shelter can house 132 people for one year. 

"I'm careful not to promote fear," Vicino told the LA Times. "But sooner or later, I believe you're going to need to seek shelter."

A YouTube video from 2010 promoting the shelter suggests that other shelters are also in the works: "A nationwide network of hardened, deep underground shelters, built to survive major future Earth devastating disasters," the video description says. Watch below: