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Om Yun Choi, North Korean weightlifter, breaks Olympics record

North Korean weightlifter Om Yun Choi broke the Olympics record in the clean and jerk after lifting triple his body weight.
Om yun choi 2012 7 29Enlarge
North Korean weightlifter Om Yun Choi in action at the London Olympics. (AFP/Getty Images)

According to his official biography, the late North Korean leader Kim Jong-il could control the weather with his mood.

Little did the authors know that the “Dear Leader” could also break Olympic records.

North Korean weightlifter Om Yun Choi today set an Olympic record when he lifted 168 kilograms – three times his body weight – in the clean and jerk in the men’s 56kg category, the Associated Press reported.

The 20-year-old, who is just 1.52 meters tall, gave all the credit to the late leader for the historic feat.

"How can any man possibly lift 168kg? I believe the great Kim Jong-il looked over me," Om said.

“My parents were not here, I am here only with my coach. I believe Kim Jong-il gave me the record and all my achievements. It is all because of him."

It was an impressive achievement, whoever was responsible.

According to the Independent, Om is only the fifth man in history to lift triple his own body weight.

Om ranked 11th in the world in 2011 and the best “clean and jerk” he registered last year was 156 kilograms at junior worlds, the AP said.

The Houston Chronicle said Om was in the B group with lower-ranked weightlifters.

He will have to wait until the medal contenders in the A group compete later today to find out if his performance was good enough to earn him the gold.

More from GlobalPost: Coverage of the 2012 London Olympics

 

http://www.globalpost.com/dispatches/globalpost-blogs/world-at-play/om-yun-choi-north-korean-weightlifter-breaks-olympics-reco

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