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Hello World

Hi everybody,

I'm looking foward to covering climate change and the environment for Global Post. It's an exciting time for me. In addition to starting here, I've just published a book on the consequences of climate change: Forecast: The Consequences of Climate Change, from the Amazon to the Arctic, from Darfur to Napa Valley

Born from an article in The Atlantic exploring the links between global warming and the conflict in Darfur, it's an effort to take readers around the world looking at how climate change is changing the way we live. In addition to revisiting Sudan, where I weave in some early reporting on the conflict I did for Time Magazine, I look at rougher waters off the Gulf Coast, at immigration pressures in Europe, at the spread of disease in Brazil and the American Southwest, at the changing taste of wine in Napa Valley, and the shifting geopolitics of the Arctic, and at the potential for catastrophe in South Asia.

Happily, the early reviews are in and they're ... very complimentary!

Fred Pearce, writing in Orion Magazine says

Well worth the carbon footprint of its publication … The most perceptive [book] so far about [climate change’s] growing place in our daily lives, our iconography, and, sometimes, our paranoias.

Read the whole thing here.

In the American Prospect, Chris Mooney, author of Storm World, does a good job of laying out what the book is about. On Mooney’s website, he also writes: 

Stephan Faris’s Forecast is a journalistic take on global warming, the kind of book I might have liked to write myself with a better travel budget. It’s colorful, writerly, dispatched from the front lines. The key theme: In less stable parts of the world, global warming is the straw that breaks the camel’s back. It can tip fragile societies over the edge. And that’s already happening.

Those interested in having a taste should check out the Top 10 list I did for Scientific American.

You can follow Forecast's progress at www.stephanfaris.com, on Facebook, or — of course — here!

http://www.globalpost.com/notebook/environment/090110/hello-world