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From the Dept. of Love Stinks: Broken hearts, on exhibit

ZAGREB — A German husband and wife divorce after 13 years of marriage before moving to different countries. To help her cope, he allows her to keep their dog. Later, she sends him a light she would attach to the dog’s collar to ensure it wouldn’t get lost on dark winter evenings. Then she commits suicide. That’s all that’s known about the couple from a note accompanying the light, now one of the most poignant displays in the Museum of Broken Relationships.

8 killed as Czech bus crashes in Croatia

The cause of the crash is still under investigation, but local media said the bus hit a road barrier, turned over and smashed into a concrete fence on the opposite side of the road.

Croatia votes yes to EU membership

Nation at the heart of Balkan wars will become 28th member of EU this year
Croatia euEnlarge
Croatian Prime Minister Zoran Milanovic raises his glass of champagne after hearing the first preliminary results of the EU referendum last night (HRVOJE POLAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Croatia is a nation born in blood. 20 years ago, as former Yugoslavia broke up it was the site of the first modern Balkan war. Later it was a key player in the second Balkan war, the one in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Croatia had for years made no secret of wanting to join the EU but the union's recent troubles, particularly in the euro zone core, was expected to make yesterday's referendum a close-run thing.

It wasn't.

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