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NATO won't halt Libya air war yet, Leon Panetta says

NATO won't halt its bombing campaign in Libya, U.S. Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said Thursday, owing to continued fighting around Sirte, birthplace of Muammar al-Gaddafi.

Aung San Suu Kyi foresees change in Myanmar

Aung San Suu Kyi, foresees "signs of real change very soon" in Myanmar but has urged the world not to take its eye off her country.

Libya leadership talks fail, as Gaddafi's forces fend off rebel attack (VIDEO)

Libya's interim leaders have failed to form a new cabinet, as efforts to overcome forces loyal to Muammar al-Gaddafi meet resistance.

Volunteer medic shot dead by Assad’s security forces

Rights groups slam further evidence of Syrian regime’s systematic campaign of assault against medics and those they treat.
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The Syrian Red Crescent ambulance was left peppered with bullet holes along its sides, rear and roof as well as through its front windscreen after the attack on September 7. The attack, which the Red Crescent blamed on Syrian security forces, killed one of the three volunteer medics. (Courtesy)

One of three Red Crescent volunteer medics injured when their ambulance was shot repeatedly by Syrian security forces in the central city of Homs died on Thursday of his wounds.

Hakam Draak al-Sibai died in Lebanon’s American University Hospital from gunshot wounds sustained on September 7 when the Red Crescent ambulance he was transporting a wounded man in came under fire in Homs’ Abu Hol street.

In a report on the attack, a leaked Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC) document said the gunfire came from either “security or the army” and said 31 bullets had been fired at the ambulance from four sides as it transported a man who had been wounded in his arm in an earlier attack.

Photos of the ambulance show it peppered with bullet holes along its sides, rear and roof as well as through its front windscreen and blood stains are seen on the passenger seat and on the floor of the vehicle.

The two other volunteers in the ambulance at the time, Muhammad Hakam Mubarak and Abdel Hameed al-Fajr were also injured, as was the patient.
GlobalPost first reported in May on the systematic attempt by Syrian security forces to prevent injured protestors receiving medical care and the dangers faced by medics attempting to treat them.

Read GlobalPost: Syrian protesters denied medical care

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Who watches the watchers?

Citizen spies form the bedrock of Syria's security state. Amid the revolution, activists are outing suspected informers — putting them at the mercy of their peers.

Syrian forces taking wounded from hospitals, HRW claims (VIDEO)

President Bashar al-Assad reportedly declared a state of war on Wednesday and issued a general mobilization of troops.

Syria allows Red Cross to tour Damascus prison

According to human rights activists, Syria has arrested tens of thousands of people since protests against the regime of President Bashar al-Assad began, a follow-on from uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. 

Gaddafi remains threat to Libya

Analysts say the large amount of missiles, and chemical weapons reportedly possessed by Gaddafi's forces, including an estimated 10 tons or more of mustard gas remain a huge danger.

China and Russia boycott sanctions against Syria

Brazil, India and South Africa, non-permanent members of the council, are also believed to have strong reservations about sanctions.

Syrian sense of humor failure

One of the best-known cartoonists in the Arab world, Ali Farzat, has been beaten up by Syrian security forces.
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President Assad is shown patiently white-washing the shadow of a huge security thug on a wall, while the real man stands untouched. The caption reads: "Lifting the emergency law". (Screengrab)

According to activists Ali Farzat, whose work is strongly critical of the government, was forced out of his car in Damascus, badly beaten and dumped at the side of the road, BBC writes.

“In one of his latest cartoons, Ali Farzat shows President Assad sweatily clutching a suitcase while he tries to hitch a lift with the Libyan leader, Col Gaddafi, who is furiously driving a getaway car.

The Syrian cartoonist has produced a stream of images like this in the past few months that have directly attacked the Syrian leader.

In one, President Assad is shown patiently white-washing the shadow of a huge security thug on a wall, while the real man stands untouched. The caption reads: "Lifting the emergency law".

Another shows Mr Assad flexing in uniform in front of a mirror that reflects back a dominant, muscular image, overshadowing his puny figure.

For 40 years, Ali Farzat has been skewering the mismatch between rhetoric and reality in the Arab world.

In his meticulous drawings, mostly without captions, he has shown the overbearing brutality of bureaucracy, the hypocrisy of leaders, and myriad other injustices of daily life that have resonated across the Middle East.

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