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Europe's economy: From mediocre to worse (Infographic)

A new round of economic data shows that Europe's crisis isn't getting any better.
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German Chancellor Angela Merkel, pictured at the Christian Democrats' forum in November 2011. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Attention, German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

You still have a problem.

As much of Europe fritters away another August vacation, the economic world keeps spinning.

And unfortunately for the world's largest economic bloc, the news isn't getting better.

Overall, the euro zone economy contracted by 0.2 percent from the previous quarter.

As for Italy, Spain, Portugal and Greece? You don't even want to know.

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This is why Europe is getting crushed today

Euro zone finance ministers officially signed off on a plan that's expected to provide about 100 billion euros ($120 billion) to Spain's troubled banks.

Germany, Italy and Spain to the rescue? Nope.

The parliaments of Germany, Spain and Italy all voted Thursday on key measures designed to counter Europe's debt crisis, but there was little relief for the euro zone as markets pushed rates on Spanish bonds high into the bailout danger zone.
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