Connect to share and comment

A Daughter's Journey, Part V: Mothers2Mothers in Cape Town

Tracy Jarrett takes an extraordinary journey to learn about the disease that took her mother's life and forever changed her own. In Cape Town, she finds Mothers2Mothers, a program that hires HIV-positive mothers to mentor other HIV-positive mothers.
Tracys journey graphic 20120619Enlarge
(Emily Judem/GlobalPost)
CAPE TOWN — Maletsatsi Mbayi sat behind her desk taking notes in a log that tracks patient visits, pregnancy plans, and whether or not the patients who are expectant mothers are receiving treatment. She welcomed me with a warm smile. Her hair was braided and pinned up, her glasses slid partially down her nose, and her white uniform was perfectly ironed. Right away, Mbayi began describing her duties as a mentor mother at the Mothers2Mothers room in the Mowbray Maternity Hospital, and rattling off facts and statistics about HIV with confidence and charisma. I interrupted her. “I want to hear about you,” I told her. “I want to know your story, and how you started working for Mothers2Mothers.”
More

Adult circumcision campaign fails in AIDS-plagued Swaziland

EZULWINI, Swaziland — Though circumcision has proven to be an effective way to lower HIV/AIDS infection rates, the majority of Swazi men have resisted the "circumcise and conquer" campaign.

A Daughter's Journey: On the Ground in Cape Town, reflecting on HIV/AIDS

Tracy Jarrett takes an extraordinary journey — from Chicago to Cape Town, South Africa — to learn about the disease that took her mother's life and forever changed her own.
Tracys journey graphic 20120619Enlarge
(Emily Judem/GlobalPost)
“A Daughter's Journey" is a series of blog posts by Tracy Jarrett, a GlobalPost/Kaiser Family Foundation global health reporting fellow. Tracy is traveling from her hometown, Chicago, to Cape Town, South Africa as part of a Special Report entitled "AIDS: A Turning Point.” AIDS took her mother's life when she was five years old.
More

Testing Matters: Massachusetts' new HIV testing law and what it means

Larry Day was diagnosed with HIV in April 1996, after being tested without giving his consent. In this video, Day tells his HIV testing story and explains why both the new Massachusetts law and doctor-patient conversation are important.
Larry day hiv testing 120629Enlarge
Larry Day, Manager of HIV Health Promotion at the AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts (Emily Judem/GlobalPost)
BOSTON – Larry Day was diagnosed with HIV in April, 1996, after being tested without giving his consent. He arrived at the hospital sick, and the doctor tested him for HIV without his knowledge. Without the opportunity for counseling or a conversation with the doctor, he said, he wasn’t mentally prepared to hear the news.
More

A Daughter's Journey: On the Ground in Cape Town

VIDEO: Tracy Jarrett takes an extraordinary journey — from Chicago to Cape Town, South Africa — to learn about the disease that took her mother's life and forever changed her own.
Tracys journey graphic 20120619Enlarge
(Emily Judem/GlobalPost)
“A Daughter's Journey" is a series of blog posts by Tracy Jarrett, a GlobalPost/Kaiser Family Foundation global health reporting fellow. Tracy is traveling from her hometown, Chicago, to Cape Town, South Africa as part of a Special Report entitled "AIDS: A Turning Point.”
More

National HIV Testing Day: A delicate balance

The US has jumped on the routinized testing bandwagon. But a balance must be struck between making testing more widely available, and making sure patients have enough time and resources for counseling if they test positive.
Hiv testing day 20120627Enlarge
A man reads education literature as he waits for an HIV test at a free mobile testing center in Los Angeles. (Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)
The goal of National HIV Testing Day (NHTD) is to encourage routine testing and early detection of HIV, according to the National Association of People with AIDS, the organization that founded NHTD 18 years ago. And throughout the country, organizations and governments are working toward this goal. Indeed, the US has jumped on the routinized testing bandwagon. But here's the catch–there’s a delicate balance that must be struck when it comes to making HIV tests routine, said Larry Day, Manager of HIV Health Promotion at the AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts.
More

Startling rise in HIV/AIDS in US black community

Commentary: The story behind the making of "Thirteen Percent," a film about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the African-American community.
Hiv aids epidemic us african americansEnlarge
A worker passes out flyers for free HIV testing outside a Walgreens pharmacy in Times Square in New York City. June 27 is National HIV Testing Day and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is rolling out a new program offering free rapid HIV testing in pharmacies in 24 cities and rural communities. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
ALEXANDRIA — Convinced that we needed do something to draw attention to what is clearly a crisis, I assembled a small team and began pre-production on a film that would address this tragic situation. We began a journey seeking an answer to a singular question: How could 13 percent of America’s population of more than 305 million people now account for 50 percent of new HIV infections?
More

A Daughter's Journey, Part IV: Ladies build support in Langa

Tracy Jarrett takes an extraordinary journey — from Chicago to Cape Town, South Africa — to learn about the disease that took her mother's life and forever changed her own. She has finally arrived in Cape Town.
Tracys journey graphic 20120619Enlarge
(Emily Judem/GlobalPost)
CAPE TOWN—The ladies, as they have come to be known, arrive to work by 9:00 every morning. Their office is an old mini bus (taxi) station in the center of Langa township. The dilapidated white building is dark inside; a table lined with blue plastic chairs is set up by the window, and two men sit in a small office behind security glass. Resembling a YMCA-meets-doctor’s office, this station has housed the Langa Action Community AIDS Program (L.A.C.A.P.) for seven years.
More

US on target with AIDS goals, top official says

One month before the International AIDS Conference, Ambassador Eric Goosby addressed an audience at the Brookings Institute. He said the Obama administration was on target for meeting its HIV/AIDS goals.
Eric goosby 20120625Enlarge
US Global AIDS Coordinator Ambassador Eric P. Goosby (Tim Sloan/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC—One month before the International AIDS Conference, the top US official overseeing the global AIDS fight today said that the Obama administration was on target for meeting goals for putting people on treatment, reducing the number of babies infected with HIV, and expanding male circumcisions – but he acknowledged the circumcision effort was tough going.
More

New numbers show mixed picture in DC's AIDS fight

Washington, DC has released more information about its HIV/AIDS epidemic – and the results are mixed.
Dc aids hiv numbers 20120622Enlarge
A large red ribbon hangs on the North Portico of the White House in Washington on November 30, 2010. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
The nation’s capital has released more information about its epidemic – and it’s a mixed picture. The District reported Wednesday that the number of residents infected with HIV in 2010 has increased by nearly 3,000 people since 2006, but DC's overall prevalence rate has dropped from 3.2 percent in 2009 to 2.7 percent. So is DC making progress in its AIDS fight?
More
Syndicate content