Connect to share and comment

Death toll in Eastern Europe rises as big freeze continues

“We are barely coping," says Bosnian villager, Radenka Jeftovic

On the town in Budapest: Gays hit the straight bar for hetero men

Welcome to Coronita, otherwise known as “the bar where gay men go to pick up straight men.”
CoronitaEnlarge
Coronita, an after-party bar in Budapest, Hungary. Otherwise known as "the bar where gay men go to pick up straight men" (I.Roze/GlobalPost)

Earlier this month when I was in Budapest, I accidentally found an after-party place called Coronita.

Among locals, it is casually known as “the bar where gay men go to pick up heterosexual men.”

Apparently, this concept isn’t at all unusual.

“It’s a straight club,” says Akos, a local gay man. “But the gays go there around 5 a.m. to pick the men who haven’t managed to pick up any women all night, but don’t want to go home alone.”

It’s not the first time I was confronted with this kind of “situational sexuality,” which is fairly widespread in Eastern Europe.

I have previously researched the phenomenon of straight men who are “gay for pay” or lesbians prostitutes, who make a living by having sex with men. Both instances were heavily aided by drugs, as is -- quite clearly -- “the bar where gay men go to pick up straight men.”

Still, drugs or no drugs, one can’t help but wonder: who are these men who “haven’t managed to pick up any women all night, but don’t want to go home alone?"

And who exactly are these gay men who prey on the “straight scraps?” Doesn't the stereotype have it that gay men are much pickier than heterosexual men and women about who they have sex with? 

It was the late Christopher Hitchens, who put it best in his memoir, Hitch 22, when he described his 30s this way: 

More

Hungarian government back tracks: a little

Foreign minister Janos Martonyi indicates controversial constitutional changes may be rescinded
JanosEnlarge
Hungarian Foreign Minister Janos Martonyi surrounded by the stars of the EU. The EU is demanding the Hungarian government restore independence to its central bank as a condition of backing its request for bailout funds from the IMF. (GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images)

Debtors can't be choosers is the lesson for Hungary's extreme right-wing government. The government of Viktor Orban has brought in major constitutional changes in recent weeks The Hungarian opposition say these undermine democracy via rigid gerrymandering of electoral districts and restrictions on freedom of the press among other things.

The IMF, from whom Hungary wants more money, is exercised by constitutional changes that undermine the central bank's independence. So is the EU which must give its bona fides for Hungary to get the loan. No more money until that problem is fixed.

More

New year, new crisis point: Hungary

Hard-right government's changes to constitution spark protests
Hungary protestEnlarge
An anti-government demonstrator last night in Budapest (FERENC ISZA/AFP/Getty Images)
Protests in Hungary over hard-right government's constitutional changes which opponents say threaten basic freedoms
More

Hungary stages mass protest against new constitution

As officials arrived for a gala event to celebrate the new constitution, protesters chanting slogans and carrying placards denounced what they called Prime Minister Viktor Orban's "dictatorship."

Mixed messages from today's European bond auctions

Italian 10 year bond rates are finally back under 7 percent ... but only just. Meanwhile Hungary looks like the next target of bond markets.
Monti bondsEnlarge
Mario Monti today at a press conference following an auction of 10-year Italian bonds that saw yield prices come down below the danger level of 7 percent (GABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/Getty Images)
Italian 10 year bond rates are finally back under 7 percent ... but only just. Meanwhile Hungary looks like the next target of bond markets.
More

Hungary for a "fat tax"

GRAZ, Austria — Indulgent Hungarian specialities like deep-fried goose fat would not be given special treatment.
Syndicate content