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Facebook is 'friending' Latin America

LIMA — Latin America, where 1 in 3 people already have Facebook accounts, will increasingly drive the social network’s global profits.

Turkey's Twitter problem

ISTANBUL — Even as authorities moved to crackdown on social media amid a widening protest movement that engulfed cities across Turkey in recent weeks, Turkish officials are also emerging as avid users of both Twitter and Facebook.

The queen’s tweets

  LONDON — There are no “selfies.” No late-night rants or public feuds with foreign royal figures. No pictures of corgis with “LOL!!!” captions. But with nearly a half-million followers, The British Monarchy — the queen’s official Twitter account — is one of a steadily increasing number of official social media channels shaping the royals’ public image.

Obama: Don't want a tax hike? You better tweet it!

President Barack Obama is pushing his "fiscal cliff" plan with a famililar campaigning strategy: social media. The White House launched a new Twitter hashtag Wednesday in an effort to encourage Americans to express their support for Obama's plan to extend the George W. Bush-era tax cuts, which are set to expire at the end of the year, for middle-class Americans.

Tweet at your own risk — Bolivia’s Big Brother could be watching

LIMA, Peru — Bolivian cybernauts are up in arms at suggestions by high officials in President Evo Morales’ administration that it may regulate social media. Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera floated the idea that online critics could be held accountable. But the president has backed away from crushing digital dissent.

Anti-US protests and the challenges of '21st century statecraft'

In a speech on Tuesday, President Obama touched on the realities of information-sharing technologies playing a wide role in world affairs. "At a time when anyone with a cell phone can spread offensive views around the world with the click of a button, the notion that we can control the flow of information is obsolete. The question, then, is how we respond."

Menshn 'Twitter-killer' launches in the US

Two weeks ago saw the launch of a new social networking site — Menshn — that sought to change the way conversations work online. At the time, the site's co-founder, British Member of Parliament Louise Mensch, told TechCrunch's UK editor Mike Butcher that she had decided to found the site in a bid to create a better system for debate than Twitter. The self-described "obsessive user of social media" (she currently has over 60,000 Twitter followers herself) was sick of the off-topic tweets she saw, and wanted a better way to follow the topics she wanted than the chaos of hashtags.

Al Jazeera Twitter account hacked by Bashar al-Assad's supporters

In a string of tweets, the hacker or hackers ask The Guardian's editors if they know they're "participating in violence in Syria," and accuse Al Jazeera of "fabricating another child martyr."

Are Facebook's days numbered? (VIDEO)

Eric Jackson, founder of Ironfire Capital, believes Facebook is close to its demise.
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Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the opening keynote address at the f8 Developer Conference April 21, 2010 in San Francisco, California. (Justin Sullivan/AFP/Getty Images)
Eric Jackson, founder of Ironfire Capital, believes Facebook is close to its demise.
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Does Chavez govern by Twitter?

Venezuela's president tweets from Cuba to announce multimillion-dollar state expenditures.
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Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's Twitter handle, @chavezcandanga, turned 2 in April, with over 2.8 million followers. Tweets seem to be among Chavez's favorite media on which to announce big government news. (JUAN BARRETO/AFP/Getty Images)

Venezuela President Hugo Chavez said he approved $500 million to revamp the naval infantry. Nice hunk of cash. That was just one in a long list of announcements that Chavez has made recently — on Twitter.

Chavez is battling cancer and his frequent absences — for radiation treatment in Cuba — are fanning speculation that his rule could soon come to an end.

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