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Who let the Gupta family land at a South African military base?

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — The South African government is investigating why a passenger plane from India, carrying 300 wedding guests of a wealthy family with close ties to President Jacob Zuma, was allowed to land at the country’s main military air base.

Keeping up with the Mandelas

JOHANNESBURG — Amid growing controversy over attempts by Nelson Mandela's children to capitalize off his legacy, two granddaughters launch Kardashian-style reality show.

'Sugar daddies are destroying our children': South Africa health minister

South Africa's health minister said Thursday that 28 percent of schoolgirls in the country were HIV positive.

Pistorious to hold private memorial for Steenkamp

Oscar Pistorious will hold a private memorial for his late girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, whom he is accused of murdering.

A Daughter's Journey: On the Ground in Cape Town, reflecting on HIV/AIDS

Tracy Jarrett takes an extraordinary journey — from Chicago to Cape Town, South Africa — to learn about the disease that took her mother's life and forever changed her own.
Tracys journey graphic 20120619Enlarge
(Emily Judem/GlobalPost)
“A Daughter's Journey" is a series of blog posts by Tracy Jarrett, a GlobalPost/Kaiser Family Foundation global health reporting fellow. Tracy is traveling from her hometown, Chicago, to Cape Town, South Africa as part of a Special Report entitled "AIDS: A Turning Point.” AIDS took her mother's life when she was five years old.
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A Daughter's Journey: On the Ground in Cape Town

VIDEO: Tracy Jarrett takes an extraordinary journey — from Chicago to Cape Town, South Africa — to learn about the disease that took her mother's life and forever changed her own.
Tracys journey graphic 20120619Enlarge
(Emily Judem/GlobalPost)
“A Daughter's Journey" is a series of blog posts by Tracy Jarrett, a GlobalPost/Kaiser Family Foundation global health reporting fellow. Tracy is traveling from her hometown, Chicago, to Cape Town, South Africa as part of a Special Report entitled "AIDS: A Turning Point.”
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A Daughter's Journey, Part IV: Ladies build support in Langa

Tracy Jarrett takes an extraordinary journey — from Chicago to Cape Town, South Africa — to learn about the disease that took her mother's life and forever changed her own. She has finally arrived in Cape Town.
Tracys journey graphic 20120619Enlarge
(Emily Judem/GlobalPost)
CAPE TOWN—The ladies, as they have come to be known, arrive to work by 9:00 every morning. Their office is an old mini bus (taxi) station in the center of Langa township. The dilapidated white building is dark inside; a table lined with blue plastic chairs is set up by the window, and two men sit in a small office behind security glass. Resembling a YMCA-meets-doctor’s office, this station has housed the Langa Action Community AIDS Program (L.A.C.A.P.) for seven years.
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A Daughter's Journey, Part III: Mother-to-child transmission in Johannesburg

Tracy Jarrett takes an extraordinary journey — from Chicago to Cape Town, South Africa — to learn about the disease that took her mother's life and forever changed her own. This is what she is finding in Johannesburg, her first stop in South Africa.
Tracys journey graphic 20120619Enlarge
(Emily Judem/GlobalPost)
JOHANNESBURG—From the outside, the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, on the outskirts of Soweto township, looks like a prison. A metal fence with security checkpoints surrounds the hospital’s large yellow brick buildings. Despite appearances, though, this research hospital has served more than three million people. It is the largest research hospital in southern Africa and among the largest in the world. When I arrived in Johannesburg, USAID representatives Shelagh O’Rourke and Themba Mathebula met me at the airport. They had arranged for me to visit Baragwanath Hospital, which is home to a USAID-funded HIV clinic that focuses on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission.
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Thanking Goodness: Community care workers and HIV/AIDS patients help each other in South Africa

PEPFAR is moving to support local leadership and implementation capacity for AIDS care and treatment. And given the South African health system’s weaknesses in the face of the magnitude of AIDS and TB, that means an investment in people like Goodness Henama –– lay listeners with just a few weeks of training.
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In Wallacedene township near Cape Town, Margaret Hans, here with her son Carlos, receives a weekly visit from community care worker Goodness Henama. (Alex Duval Smith/GlobalPost)
CAPE TOWN –– Margaret Hans, 25, shuffles to the door of her simple but immaculate two-room township home. Thin and with drawn facial features, she is still weak from tuberculosis - the all-too-familiar opportunistic scourge that piggy-backs on the South African HIV epidemic. It’s Tuesday, which means that community care worker Goodness Henama, 26, is making her weekly visit. Today, Hans has someone to talk to. In any country, quality of life is all in the detail. But in South Africa, the bigger picture is dominant: as of 2009, 5.6 million people were living with HIV, and the country has been rushing to catch up on the roll out of anti-retroviral drugs and coping with the sheer social impact of 1.9 million orphans due to AIDS. How, then, is there time to listen to Margaret?
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South Africans try poisoning horns to save rhinos

KRUGERSDORP — South Africans are trying many unusual measures, such as poisoning rhino horns, to protect the animals from deadly poaching.
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