Connect to share and comment

A World of Trouble: Is the nightmare over?

With signs of economic recovery finally emerging, here's where things stand in 20 countries.

Meet the economic gangsters

The dismal science of economics is, by most definitions, about finding the most efficient allocation of resources. And that goes for individuals, companies, governments and — yes — criminals. Edward Miguel is an expert on that last category. He's the co-author, with Raymond Fisman, of “Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence and the Poverty of Nations.” Published in late 2008, the authors use new data, innovative number-crunching and various pattern recognition models to plumb the worlds of kleptocrats, corruption, black marketeers and violence.

Honduras, backed in a corner

SAN JOSE — Honduras’ de facto president holds onto power in the capital Tegucigalpa. The country’s Stetson-sporting president in exile holds camp across the border in Nicaragua. Meanwhile, a proposed solution drafted in Costa Rica awaits their signatures. Over a month after the June 28 predawn raid on the home of President Manuel Zelaya that flung him into exile, the proposed San Jose Accord — which calls for Zelaya’s presidency to be restored — is being touted as the only hope for putting the Honduran debacle to rest.

Honduras negotiations falter

SAN JOSE — Costa Rican President Oscar Arias said in the coming days he will announce a date to resume talks to bring an end to the standoff between two men fighting for the soul of Honduras. The chosen mediator, Arias spoke to an ample crowd of reporters Friday with a voice that has grown hoarse — though not short of his usual poetics — after two days of intense negotiations that failed to reach a hoped-for resolution.

Arias keeps talks going to find Honduras solution

Talks to end the Honduran standoff are continuing into the early morning hours here in San José behind closed-doors at President Oscar Arias’ home, after two Hondurans came agreeing only on one thing: They refuse to negotiate. Honduras’ de facto president, Roberto Micheletti, departed this evening after a three-hour meeting with Arias, who is serving as mediator through the process, leaving behind a commission that possibly could hammer out an agreement with Manuel Zelaya, whom the military kicked out of the country on June 28.

An earthquake, revisited

TAMBOR, Costa Rica — After pulling into this small town a couple of bus rides northwest of the capital San Jose, it seems like the words are on everyone’s lips. When asked how to find the construction site for their soon-to-be neighbors, locals will practically finish your sentence: “You mean the Habitat for Humanity site? It’s a few hundred meters down the road,” a shopkeeper says.

Costa Rica's Oscar Arias to mediate in Honduras crisis

Costa Rica’s President Oscar Arias will serve as mediator this week in negotiations to broker an agreement between Honduras’s two presidents: deposed leader Manuel Zelaya and the man named to succeed him, Roberto Micheletti. The talks are slated to begin Thursday in Arias’ San José home, the Costa Rican leader said in a press conference this afternoon also held inside his elegant residence.

Costa Rica's Oscar Arias to mediate in Honduras crisis

Costa Rica’s President Oscar Arias will serve as mediator this week in negotiations to broker an agreement between Honduras’s two presidents: deposed leader Manuel Zelaya and the man named to succeed him, Roberto Micheletti. The talks are slated to begin Thursday morning in Arias’ San Jose home, the Costa Rican leader said in a press conference Tuesday afternoon also held inside his elegant residence.

Don't worry, be Costa Rican

Costa Ricans sure are a happy bunch The "ticos" (colloquial for Costa Ricans), just topped a new list of the happiest people on the planet compiled by an independent research group in Britain. The country scores 76.1 out of 100 on the New Economics Foundation’s Happy Planet Index (HPI), which measures life expectancy, satisfaction and a country's environmental footprint. The index was released Saturday.

The celebrities are gone, but locals remain

SARAPIQUI, Costa Rica — Entertainment blogs ate it up when mildly famous people were dropped into the jungle here to endure humiliating torture tactics and hundreds of bug bites to compete against the likes of the wife of Illinois' scandal-embroiled former governor Rod Blagojevich.
Syndicate content