Connect to share and comment

Putting the 'war' back into drug war

MEXICO CITY — The corpses of the 12 police officers were laid out along the mountain highway in a neat line, the cuts and burns of torture scarring their torsos and bullets embedded in their brains. Surrounding the carnage were three notes bearing the same message in scrawled handwriting: “Try and arrest another one of us. We are waiting for you here.” The mass killing of the federal agents, who had been abducted while off duty, happened at the peak of a rampant offensive by a Western Mexico drug cartel against government forces over the last week.

Chatter: What we're hearing

Need to know: Many Mexicans seek political asylum in the U.S. because they fear drug violence at home. But they face a tough battle with U.S. immigration law. Some of their attorneys were so upset by the situation they went to the press. Wonder what Kim Jong Il's saber-rattling means at home? Stricter controls on market and food aid, according to The Washington Post.

Attorneys speak out on Mexican deportations

SAN ANTONIO, Texas — Their stories may be heart-rending. Their experiences may seem unimaginable. Their lives may still be at risk. But the growing numbers of Mexican citizens who have fled rampaging drug trafficking cartels to seek American political asylum are finding the door slammed shut in their faces. U.S. immigration judges are expelling Mexican asylum seekers, leaving them to face their cartel demons, according to confidential records provided to GlobalPost and interviews with seven lawyers handling such cases.

It's the economy, estupido!

Top News: Mexico's July 5 midterm elections were one bad blow for the party of President Felipe Calderon. His conservative National Action Party or PAN was hammered across the country.  In total, its share of the 500-seat Congress shrunk from 206 to 143 seats. Meanwhile, the big winner was the Institutional Revolutionary Party or PRI, which ruled Mexico for most of the twentieth century.

Full Frame: African rhythm to a Latin American beat

Full Frame features photo essays and conversations with photographers in the field. See more Full Frame galleries here and here.

Full Frame: Africans in the Americas

Chatter: What we're hearing

Need to know: Clashes in the region of Xinjiang spurred China's President Hu Jintao to leave Italy — where he was due to attend the G8 summit today — and return to China. Military police are attempting to quell the violence, which has killed more than 150 people and wounded more than 1,000. More than 1,400 people have been arrested since Sunday.

Full Frame: Worshipping Saint Death

Full Frame features photo essays and conversations with photographers in the field. See more Full Frame galleries here and here.

Full Frame: The culture of death

Vote for Nulo

 
Syndicate content