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Obama in Beijing: What you will see. And won't see.

BEIJING, China – Through 30 years of fits and starts, the United States and China have soared and stumbled into one of the most important bilateral relationships in the world.

Analysis: Kim Jong Il's cry for help

SEOUL, South Korea — The Nov. 10 naval clash in disputed Korean waters between North and South Korean forces ended in an intense exchange of fire and the retreat of a North Korean vessel enveloped in flames. The skirmish off the west coast of the Korean Peninsula — the first in seven years — was a stark reminder that the two Koreas are still at war. But most analysts believe that what appeared to be an aggressive clash was in fact a sign from Pyongyang that it is willing to continue engaging with the rest of the world.

Faux human embryo cloner is convicted

Top news: Hwang Woo-suk, the disgraced stem cell scientist who was once hailed as a national hero, was convicted for falsifying his research and embezzling government research funds. The court, however, handed down a suspended two-year prison sentence saying that Hwang has shown remorse and that the scientist did leave significant research achievements.  

Silicon Sweatshops: A promising model

[Editor’s note: Silicon Sweatshops is a five-part investigation of the supply chains that produce many of the world’s most popular technology products, from Apple iPhones, to Nokia cell phones, Dell keyboards and more.

Silicon Sweatshops: The China connection

[Editor’s note: Silicon Sweatshops is a five-part investigation of the supply chains that produce many of the world’s most popular technology products, from Apple iPhones, to Nokia cell phones, Dell keyboards and more.

Silicon Sweatshops: Disposable workforce

[Editor’s note: Silicon Sweatshops is a five-part investigation of the supply chains that produce many of the world’s most popular technology products, from Apple iPhones, to Nokia cell phones, Dell keyboards and more.

N.Korea says it produced more arms-grade plutonium

North Korea said it has reprocessed spent fuel rods at its Yongbyon nuclear plant and has produced more arms-grade plutonium from the material, according to South Korea's Yonhap News Agency. The announcement was made through the North's state-run news agency which said the country had successfully concluded the reprocessing of 8,000 spent fuel rods at the end of August, according to Yonhap. The reprocessing of the fuel rods would give North Korea more material to build atomic arms.

Landmark trade deal is signed

Top News: North Korea apologized in cross-border talks with South Korea for the sudden release of dam water, which caused six deaths in the South from flood water that swept down across the border.

North Korean refugees breach marine surveillance

Top News: A group of eleven

Separated families reunite with tears in North Korea

Families separated by the Korean War more than half a decade ago embraced again through tears on Saturday at a tourist site in North Korea. It was the first time they had seen their siblings and children since a heavily fortified border was put up between the two Koreas during the Cold War. Seoul and Pyongyang agreed to resume family reunions after suspending the event for two years due to escalating political tension after South Korea's conservative President Lee Myung-bak took office.
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