Seafood Slavery http://www.globalpost.com/taxonomy/term/22179/all en Did these ex-slaves catch your lunch? http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/thailand/120425/seafood-slavery-part-1 <p>PREY VENG, Cambodia &mdash; In the sun-baked flatlands of Cambodia, where dust stings the eyes and chokes the pores, there is a tiny clapboard house on cement stilts. It is home to three generations of runaway slaves. The man of the house, Sokha, recently returned after nearly two years in captivity. His home is just as he left it: barren with a few dirty pillows passing for furniture. Before his December escape, Sokha (a pseudonym) was the property of a deep-sea trawler captain. The 39-year-old Cambodian, his teenage son and two young nephews were purchased for roughly $650, he said, each through brokers promising under-the-table jobs in a fish cannery. There was no cannery. They were instead smuggled to a pier in neighboring Thailand, where they were shoved aboard a wooden vessel that motored into a lawless sea.</p> <p><a href="http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/thailand/120425/seafood-slavery-part-1" target="_blank">read more</a></p> Seafood Slavery Food & Drink Wildlife News Global Economy United States Thailand Mon, 21 May 2012 10:00:00 +0000 Patrick Winn 5701832 at http://www.globalpost.com Desperate life at sea http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/thailand/120425/seafood-slavery-part-2 <p>SAMUT SAKHON, Thailand &mdash; To hear Jord tell it, a deep-sea boatman&rsquo;s life is one long knife fight. His nastiest scar starts above his eyes. It runs straight to his crown in a pink groove, the outcome of a man&rsquo;s attempt to split his skull like a melon. Other limbs of the 40-year-old Thai boat mechanic haven&rsquo;t fared much better. A quarter-sized chunk of shin meat was sheared from his right leg. His back is pitted with hack marks. But a snarling boar, tattooed in jagged lines into his bicep, suggests that his enemies got the worst of it. Jord tapped its inky snout and read aloud the lettering underneath. &ldquo;I always win,&rdquo; said the squat, sun-leathered fisherman in a high rasp.</p> <p><a href="http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/thailand/120425/seafood-slavery-part-2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> Seafood Slavery Food & Drink Wildlife News Global Economy Thailand Mon, 21 May 2012 10:00:00 +0000 Patrick Winn 5701835 at http://www.globalpost.com Motherships in the abyss http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/thailand/120425/seafood-slavery-part-3 <p>SAMUT SAKHON, Thailand &mdash; The laundering begins in a sub-zero chamber floating far from civilization. It is filled with heaps of fish, and men dressed like eskimos. This is the fridge room on a vessel known as a &ldquo;mothership.&rdquo; These hulking vessels serve as deep-sea resupply stations for trawlers seeking fuel, meat, medicine, spare parts and even laborers to replace men lost at sea. The ship&rsquo;s most important function, however, is receiving wild catch into its icy bowels and ferrying it to onshore fishmongers. Some motherships and fishing boats operate under the same syndicate. Motherships that don&#39;t collect a fee for transporting catch to the buyer, typically a fishmonger stationed at a specific dock. Once a squid or sardine comes aboard the mothership, there is almost no way to know whether it was netted by paid fishermen or sea slaves.</p> <p><a href="http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/thailand/120425/seafood-slavery-part-3" target="_blank">read more</a></p> Seafood Slavery Food & Drink Wildlife News Global Economy Thailand Mon, 21 May 2012 10:00:00 +0000 Patrick Winn 5701836 at http://www.globalpost.com Slavery at sea has Thailand teetering toward US sanctions http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/thailand/130621/thailand-human-trafficking-us-state-department-sanctions-fish-export <p>BANGKOK, Thailand &mdash; Forced labor abuses play out on Thai-owned fishing trawlers each day. For years, US officials have urged Thailand, one of America&rsquo;s closest Asian allies, to rid its $7.3 billion fisheries export industry of these abuses. If one more year passes without major strikes against Thai trafficking syndicates, the US State Department will be forced, by law, to hit Thailand with sanctions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/thailand/130621/thailand-human-trafficking-us-state-department-sanctions-fish-export" target="_blank">read more</a></p> Seafood Slavery Want to Know Thailand Sun, 23 Jun 2013 14:08:15 +0000 Patrick Winn 5863659 at http://www.globalpost.com