Connect to share and comment

Twitter says CEO, co-founders don't plan on selling stock after lockup expires on May 5

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Twitter says its CEO Dick Costolo and co-founders Jack Dorsey and Evan Williams have no plans to sell any of their shares when the company's post-IPO lock-up expires on May 5. Lock-up periods prevent company insiders from selling stock following an initial public offering. Twitter went public on Nov. 7, pricing its stock at $26 per share. The stock later soared as high as $74.73. On Monday, the stock was trading at $40.49, up about 1 per cent.

Twitter says CEO, co-founders don't plan on selling stock after lockup expires on May 5

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Twitter says its CEO Dick Costolo and co-founders Jack Dorsey and Evan Williams have no plans to sell any of their shares when the company's post-IPO lock-up expires on May 5. Lock-up periods prevent company insiders from selling stock following an initial public offering. Twitter went public on Nov. 7, pricing its stock at $26 per share. The stock later soared as high as $74.73. On Monday, the stock was trading at $40.49, up about 1 per cent.

Investors support deals spree, happy to see U.S. companies buy growth

By Soyoung Kim and Olivia Oran NEW YORK (Reuters) - After years of responding to shareholder calls for stock buybacks and dividends, major American companies are hearing a different demand from investors: buy growth. In a low-growth economy in which earnings gains have trailed a run-up in share prices, investors are ready to endorse big deals if that's what it takes to boost revenue and profits.

China's John Zhao seeks more targets in state sector reform

By Matthew Miller BEIJING (Reuters) - Hony Capital, the private-equity firm backed by Legend Holdings, is likely to deploy more capital in China's state-owned manufacturing and healthcare sectors as Beijing seeks to further restructure its government-owned companies. "This is a fabulous opportunity," said John Zhao, Hony Capital's founder and chief executive, in a recent interview. "We've accumulated a lot of strengths, experience and scars."

'Great Stretch' to secure Greek debt return

By Paul Taylor PARIS (Reuters) - Call it the Great Stretch. Two years ago, Greece's debt crisis almost brought the euro zone crashing down. Now European partners are preparing to ease Athens' debt burden without writing off their loans but by stretching them out into the distant future, extending maturities from 30 to 50 years and further cutting some interest rates, EU officials say.

Greece to issue more bonds after sale success

Greece will issue more bonds after last week's successful five-year debt sale that ended a four-year drought, the head of the debt agency said Sunday. "The bond sale was just the first step," Stelios Papadopoulos, head of the public debt management agency (PDMA) told Kathimerini daily. Greece on Thursday raised 3.0 billion euros ($4.2 billion) at under 5.0 percent interest, a move welcomed by its EU-IMF creditors.

IMF: 'herdlike' behavior driving global capital flows

Global capital flows are increasingly "herdlike" and volatile, making it harder for emerging economies to lock down capital, the International Monetary Fund said Saturday. The increased global power of bond funds, mutual funds and exchange traded funds, often underpinned by the savings of small investors, has made capital flows more fickle and risk-sensitive. That means countries on the receiving end have to work harder to hold onto capital, said Tharman Shanmugaratnam, chair of the IMF's steering committee, the International Monetary and Financial Committee.

Stocks face earnings blues after tech selloff

By Caroline Valetkevitch NEW YORK (Reuters) - The wrenching selloff in U.S. high-growth technology and biotech shares could leave investors braced for more than a minor pullback when earnings pick up speed next week. First-quarter earnings estimates have fallen sharply as many companies have blamed the brutal winter for weak outlooks. With high-valuation stocks under pressure, earnings could be subjected to even more investor scrutiny than usual.

Nasdaq pain spreads; talk of correction grows

The tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index skidded lower for the third week in a row, but this time it took the rest of the market down with it. The Nasdaq slumped 128 points (3.10 percent) to 3,999.73. The Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500, both of which avoided major falls the last two weeks, joined the Nasdaq in the red. The Dow shed 385.96 (2.35 percent) to 16,026.75, while the broad-based S&P 500 lost 49.40 (2.65 percent) to 1,815.69.

Steep drop in high-flying technology stocks stirs debate about stock market's direction

SAN FRANCISCO - The stock market's laws of gravity are ravaging its highest fliers. Just look at the list of technology trailblazers whose values have plummeted from record highs during the past few weeks. Investors have re-focused on safer sectors such as utilities, health care and consumer staples instead of companies that promise potential growth from online services that are building huge audiences.
Syndicate content