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How to avoid the trouble coming to the tech sector

By John Wasik CHICAGO (Reuters) - A resounding shot across the bow has been fired at the tech sector in recent weeks. The tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite Index is down nearly 5 percent in April through Friday's close and the Nasdaq Biotechnology Index is off 21 percent from its record closing high on February 25. Many of the sector's flagships and newcomers have been in the crosshairs. The latest tech stock falterings could be a sign of trouble ahead.

Twitter founders, CEO to keep shares after 'lockup'

Twitter co-founders Jack Dorsey and Evan Williams and chief executive Dick Costolo have no short-term plans to sell their shares in the social network, according to documents released Monday. A regulatory filing by Twitter said the three major shareholders "have informed us that they have no current plans to sell any of their shares of Twitter common stock." The news comes weeks ahead of the so-called lockup expiration on May 5, the date after which insiders would be allowed to sell holdings following Twitter's initial public offering last year.

Twitter CEO, co-founders not to sell shares after lockup ends

(Reuters) - Twitter Inc co-founders, Jack Dorsey and Evan Williams, and Chief Executive Richard Costolo have informed U.S. regulators that they did not plan to sell the microblogging company's shares after post-IPO restrictions are lifted in May. Twitter, which debuted on the New York Stock Exchange on November 7, had a 180-day restriction on sale of shares by early investors.

Twitter CEO, co-founders not to sell shares after lockup ends

(Reuters) - Twitter Inc co-founders, Jack Dorsey and Evan Williams, and Chief Executive Richard Costolo have informed U.S. regulators that they did not plan to sell the microblogging company's shares after post-IPO restrictions are lifted in May. Twitter, which debuted on the New York Stock Exchange on November 7, had a 180-day restriction on sale of shares by early investors.

Twitter says CEO, co-founders don't plan on selling stock after lockup expires on May 5

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Twitter says its CEO Dick Costolo and co-founders Jack Dorsey and Evan Williams have no plans to sell any of their shares when the company's post-IPO lock-up expires on May 5. Lock-up periods prevent company insiders from selling stock following an initial public offering. Twitter went public on Nov. 7, pricing its stock at $26 per share. The stock later soared as high as $74.73. On Monday, the stock was trading at $40.49, up about 1 per cent.

Twitter says CEO, co-founders don't plan on selling stock after lockup expires on May 5

NEW YORK, N.Y. - Twitter says its CEO Dick Costolo and co-founders Jack Dorsey and Evan Williams have no plans to sell any of their shares when the company's post-IPO lock-up expires on May 5. Lock-up periods prevent company insiders from selling stock following an initial public offering. Twitter went public on Nov. 7, pricing its stock at $26 per share. The stock later soared as high as $74.73. On Monday, the stock was trading at $40.49, up about 1 per cent.

Investors support deals spree, happy to see U.S. companies buy growth

By Soyoung Kim and Olivia Oran NEW YORK (Reuters) - After years of responding to shareholder calls for stock buybacks and dividends, major American companies are hearing a different demand from investors: buy growth. In a low-growth economy in which earnings gains have trailed a run-up in share prices, investors are ready to endorse big deals if that's what it takes to boost revenue and profits.

China's John Zhao seeks more targets in state sector reform

By Matthew Miller BEIJING (Reuters) - Hony Capital, the private-equity firm backed by Legend Holdings, is likely to deploy more capital in China's state-owned manufacturing and healthcare sectors as Beijing seeks to further restructure its government-owned companies. "This is a fabulous opportunity," said John Zhao, Hony Capital's founder and chief executive, in a recent interview. "We've accumulated a lot of strengths, experience and scars."

'Great Stretch' to secure Greek debt return

By Paul Taylor PARIS (Reuters) - Call it the Great Stretch. Two years ago, Greece's debt crisis almost brought the euro zone crashing down. Now European partners are preparing to ease Athens' debt burden without writing off their loans but by stretching them out into the distant future, extending maturities from 30 to 50 years and further cutting some interest rates, EU officials say.

Greece to issue more bonds after sale success

Greece will issue more bonds after last week's successful five-year debt sale that ended a four-year drought, the head of the debt agency said Sunday. "The bond sale was just the first step," Stelios Papadopoulos, head of the public debt management agency (PDMA) told Kathimerini daily. Greece on Thursday raised 3.0 billion euros ($4.2 billion) at under 5.0 percent interest, a move welcomed by its EU-IMF creditors.
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