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ICAP to launch electronic system for fixing orders

LONDON (Reuters) - Broker and market platform owner ICAP <IAP.L> is to launch a service designed to help shift the big voice-based orders at the center of a currency market manipulation scandal to a more transparent electronic system. ICAP will offer incentives to its voice broking team to push orders onto the new service, an ICAP spokeswoman said on Tuesday, the first initiative by a big financial company to try to resolve some of the issues raised by the market manipulation row that broke out last year.

Hong Kong, China stocks end higher

Shares in Hong Kong and China rallied on Tuesday on hopes Beijing will unveil new measures to boost the mainland economy after last week's mini-stimulus. In Hong Kong, the benchmark Hang Seng Index rose 0.98 percent, or 219.82 points, to 22,596.97 on turnover of HK$73.87 billion (US$9.53 billion). In China the benchmark Shanghai Composite Index jumped 1.92 percent, or 39.45 points, to 2,098.28 on turnover of 108.0 billion yuan ($17.4 billion).

European stocks steady at open

Europe's main stock markets opened steadily at the start of trading on Tuesday after the previous day's slump and as investors looked ahead to the release of British manufacturing data. London's benchmark FTSE 100 index dipped 0.01 percent to 6,622.23 points. In Paris, the CAC 40 index grew 0.18 percent to 4,444.02 points and Frankfurt's DAX 30 rose 0.15 percent to stand at 9,525.07 compared with Monday's closing values.

Tokyo stocks down 1.13% by break

Tokyo stocks slipped 1.13 percent Tuesday morning, tracking falls on Wall Street while a stronger yen hit exporter shares. The benchmark Nikkei 225 index fell 167.24 points to 14,641.61 by the break, while the Topix index of all first-section shares lost 1.63 percent, or 19.46 points, to 1,177.38. "Overseas investors are dumping Internet-related stocks, largely in reaction to selloffs in their overseas peers overnight," an equity trading director at a foreign brokerage said.

European stocks slump on tech fears

European stocks slumped on Monday, after heavy losses elsewhere, as investors fretted over the global technology sector, the US interest rate outlook and fresh unrest in Ukraine, dealers said. London's FTSE 100 dropped 1.09 percent to 6,622.84 points, while in Paris the CAC 40 fell 1.08 percent to 4,436.08 points, and the DAX 30 in Frankfurt shed 1.91 percent to 9,510.85 points. "The week has started firmly in the red, with UK and European markets following the lead set by Asia," said IG analyst Chris Beauchamp.

Dark markets may be more harmful than high-frequency trading

(This story has been corrected to fix spelling of name to Preece from Pierce in paragraphs 18, 27, and 30.) By John McCrank NEW YORK (Reuters) - Fears that high-speed traders have been rigging the U.S. stock market went mainstream last week thanks to allegations in a book by financial author Michael Lewis, but there may be a more serious threat to investors: the increasing amount of trading that happens outside of exchanges.

European stocks slide after losses elsewhere

European stocks fell on Monday, after heavy losses elsewhere, as investors fretted over the global technology sector, the US interest rate outlook and fresh unrest in Ukraine, dealers said. Markets won a modest boost after Swiss cement group Holcim and French rival Lafarge announced that they will merge to create a global leader in the concrete industry. London's FTSE 100 index of leading companies shed 0.78 percent to 6,643.15 points in afternoon trading.

US stocks follow most global equity markets lower

US stocks Monday moved lower in early trade, following most international equity markets in a retreat sparked by concerns that the technology sector is overvalued. About 30 minutes into trade, the Dow Jones Industrial Average shed 36.03 points (0.22 percent) to 16,376.68. The broad-based S&P 500 dipped 3.83 (0.21 percent) to 1,861.26, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index declined 7.25 (0.18 percent) to 4,120.48.

US stocks follow most global equity markets lower

US stocks Monday moved lower in early trade, following most international equity markets in a retreat sparked by concerns that the technology sector is overvalued. About 30 minutes into trade, the Dow Jones Industrial Average shed 36.03 points (0.22 percent) to 16,376.68. The broad-based S&P 500 dipped 3.83 (0.21 percent) to 1,861.26, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index declined 7.25 (0.18 percent) to 4,120.48.

Dark markets may be more harmful than high-frequency trading

By John McCrank NEW YORK (Reuters) - Fears that high-speed traders have been rigging the U.S. stock market went mainstream last week thanks to allegations in a book by financial author Michael Lewis, but there may be a more serious threat to investors: the increasing amount of trading that happens outside of exchanges.
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