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Questions on bubble as tech momentum fades

After the tech euphoria of 2013, the fast-moving sector has hit a speed bump. The wobbly action of 2014 is still an open question: is this a correction, bear market or a bubble like the catastrophic dot-com boom and bust of 1999-2000? By some measures, segments of the tech sector look to be over the top, even after recent slumps. "There are some astronomical valuations out there," says Roger Kay, an analyst who follows tech companies at Endpoint Technologies.

Russia warns US against further sanctions as Ukraine deal stalls

Russia said its military is massed on Ukraine's doorstep and warned against further US sanctions as a deal struck with Washington appeared to stall because of intransigence by Moscow-backed rebels in the former Soviet republic. A threat by US President Barack Obama that more sanctions would befall Moscow if the agreement, reached Thursday with Ukraine and the EU, failed was "absolutely unacceptable," Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told Russian television.

Russia warns US against further sanctions as Ukraine deal stalls

Russia said its military is massed on Ukraine's doorstep and warned against further US sanctions as a deal struck with Washington appeared to stall because of intransigence by Moscow-backed rebels in the former Soviet republic. A threat by US President Barack Obama that more sanctions would befall Moscow if the agreement, reached Thursday with Ukraine and the EU, failed was "absolutely unacceptable," Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told Russian television.

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Nobel winner Garcia Marquez, master of magical realism, dies at 87 MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Gabriel Garcia Marquez, the Colombian author whose beguiling stories of love and longing brought Latin America to life for millions of readers and put magical realism on the literary map, died on Thursday. He was 87. A prolific writer who started out as a newspaper reporter, Garcia Marquez's masterpiece was "One Hundred Years of Solitude," a dream-like, dynastic epic that helped him win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982.

Yoga may help women ease PTSD symptoms

By Shereen Jegtvig NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women enrolled in a small study reported a reduction in symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after a series of yoga classes. However, women in a comparison group that didn't take the classes also reported a similar decline in symptoms, researchers found. "The yoga group did well - they improved in their PTSD symptoms - and our control group actually did well, which we didn't expect," Karen Mitchell told Reuters Health.

U.S. puts off decision on Keystone XL pipeline

Washington, Apr 18 (EFE).- The U.S. State Department said Friday that it will allow more time for eight federal agencies to weigh-in on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline. "Agencies need additional time based on the uncertainty created by the on-going litigation in the Nebraska Supreme Court which could ultimately affect the pipeline route in that state," the department said in a note.

Top Hollande aide quits in conflict of interest row

By Julien Ponthus and Nicholas Vinocur CLERMONT-FERRAND, France (Reuters) - A senior adviser to French President Francois Hollande quit on Friday over accusations of past conflict of interest linked to his work for pharmaceutical firms, adding to pressure on the unpopular Socialist leader weeks before European elections.

Exclusive: Biogen prices hemophilia drug on par with older therapies

By Bill Berkrot (Reuters) - Biogen Idec Inc is pricing its newly approved long-acting hemophilia drug, Alprolix, to cost U.S. patients, and insurers, about the same per year as older, less convenient therapies whose price can reach about $300,000 annually. The move could pressure rivals such as Pfizer Inc to lower prices for existing hemophilia treatments, which provide patients with life-saving infusions of a blood clotting agent, according to doctors and industry analysts.

East and west, Ukraine rival camps dig in

By Alastair Macdonald and Aleksandar Vasovic KIEV/DONETSK, Ukraine (Reuters) - If armies march on their stomachs, then Ukraine's rival protest camps could be in for a long campaign, judging by the cooks hard at work behind the barricades in Kiev and Donetsk on Friday.

Lack of insurance tied to more emergency surgery: study

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The type of insurance people have is tied to their risk of needing emergency aorta surgery, according to a new study. Insurance, or lack thereof, is also linked to how well those people fare after surgery. Compared to people with private insurance, people without insurance were more likely to need emergency surgery on their aorta, the largest artery that supplies blood to every part of the body. They were also more likely to die or have complications after surgery.
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