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US stocks move higher as home prices rise

Wall Street stocks Tuesday reversed a two-day slide and moved higher in early trade as a US home-price index rose in January for the 24th consecutive month. About 35 minutes into trade, the Dow Jones Industrial Average jumped 100.01 points (0.61 percent) to 16,376.70. The broad-based S&P 500 rose 11.33 (0.61 percent) to 1,868.77, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index tacked on 40.34 (0.95 percent) at 4,266.72. Tuesday's gains ended a two-day skid for US stocks and came as markets in Britain, France and Germany all advanced more than one percent.

Tech share sell-off drags US stocks lower

A second straight sell-off of popular technology shares dragged US stocks lower Monday, as tensions with Russia over Ukraine kept investors on edge. The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished down 26.08 points (0.16 percent) at 16,276.69. The broad-based S&P 500 lost 9.08 (0.49 percent) at 1,857.44, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite fell 50.40 (1.2 percent) to 4,226.38. The action kept up a bearish turn that took root Friday, when the Nasdaq gave up 1 percent. On Monday the Nasdaq at one point was down more than 2.0 percent, before halving that loss.

Tech share sell-off drags US stocks lower

A second straight sell-off of popular technology shares dragged US stocks lower Monday, as tensions with Russia over Ukraine kept investors on edge. The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished down 26.08 points (0.16 percent) at 16,276.69. The broad-based S&P 500 lost 9.08 (0.49 percent) at 1,857.44, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite fell 50.40 (1.2 percent) to 4,226.38. The action kept up a bearish turn that took root Friday, when the Nasdaq gave up 1 percent. On Monday the Nasdaq at one point was down more than 2.0 percent, before halving that loss.

Tokyo shares open higher

Tokyo shares opened 0.44 percent higher Monday, rebounding from last week's losses, but market watchers said investors were likely to be cautious ahead of a looming tax hike. The headline Nikkei index at the Tokyo Stock Exchange rose 63.05 points to 14,287.28 in the first minutes of trading. It ended Thursday at a six-week low. Tokyo markets were closed on Friday for a public holiday. "Stocks are in line for a technical rebound, but trading volume remains thin," said Norihiro Fujito, senior investment strategist at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities.

US stocks pull back amid caution ahead of weekend

The S&P 500 hit a new intraday record Friday but stocks then pulled back ahead of the weekend amid profit taking and caution over the Ukraine crisis. The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished down 28.28 points (0.17 percent) at 16,302.77. The broad-based S&P 500 lost 5.49 (0.29 percent) at 1,866.52, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite slid 42.50 (0.98 percent) to 4,276.79.

US stocks push higher, shrugging off Russia tensions

US stocks powered higher in early trade Friday, as traders put behind worries about an early interest-rate hike and heightening tensions between Russia and the West. Five minutes into trade, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 114.35 points (0.70 percent) at 16,445.40. The broad-based S&P 500 advanced 11.79 (0.63 percent) to 1,883.80, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index rose 21.99 (0.51 percent) to 4,341.28. Banks added to gains from Thursday helped by most getting a strong passing grade on Federal Reserve stress tests.

Asian stock markets fall as investors start to anticipate earlier Fed interest rate hike

TOKYO - Asian stocks inched down Thursday after comments from the new head of the Federal Reserve suggested U.S. interest rates could rise sooner than financial markets were anticipating. Janet Yellen's comments after the Fed's first policy meeting since she replaced Ben Bernanke sent Wall Street lower and the dollar higher on Wednesday. The Nikkei 225, the benchmark for the Tokyo stock market, fell 0.5 per cent to 14,386.72 and South Korea's Kospi dropped 0.8 per cent to 1,922.03. Hong Kong's Hang Seng shed 0.6 per cent to 21,426.47. Australia's S

US stocks fall as Fed hints at higher rates

US stocks dropped after Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen offered a rough time-table for when the central bank could raise benchmark interest rates. At the closing bell, the Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 113.12 points (0.69 percent) to 16,223.07. The broad-based S&P 500 fell 11.41 (0.61 percent) to 1,860.84, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index declined 25.71 (0.59 percent) to 4,307.60. Stocks did not move significantly after the Fed's initial policy announcement at 1800 GMT, which, as expected, continued a plan to trim back stimulus.

US stocks tumble on Ukraine uncertainty

The growing diplomatic crisis over Ukraine rattled markets, producing the deepest declines in US stocks for a single week since January. All three indices fell, with the biggest losses coming in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which sank 387.05 (2.35 percent) to 16,065.67. The broad-based S&P 500 lost 36.91 (1.96 percent) at 1,841.13, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index gave up 90.82 (2.09 percent) at 4,245.40. Wall Street saw a flood of headlines about Ukraine that pointed to a mushrooming crisis.

Wall Street falls in choppy trade ahead of Crimea vote

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Wall Street ended lower in a volatile session on Friday, with all three major indexes posting a weekly decline, as concerns grew about tensions between Ukraine and Russia ahead of a referendum in Crimea this weekend. According to the latest available data, the Dow Jones industrial average <.DJI> fell 43.29 points or 0.27 percent, to 16,065.6, the S&P 500 <.SPX> lost 5.21 points or 0.28 percent, to 1,841.13 and the Nasdaq Composite <.IXIC> dropped 15.023 points or 0.35 percent, to 4,245.396.
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