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Failed MtGox exchange finds 200,000 Bitcoins in old wallet

Failed Bitcoin exchange MtGox says it has found 200,000 coins worth $116 million in an old "digital wallet", after it collapsed in February admitting it had lost half a billion dollars in a possible theft. The Tokyo-based digital currency exchange filed for bankruptcy protection in Japan last month, saying it had lost 850,000 coins worth nearly $500 million at present prices. But 200,000 Bitcoins were left in a "wallet" used before June 2011, the company said in a statement on its website Thursday.

Failed MtGox exchange finds 200,000 Bitcoins in old wallet

Failed Bitcoin exchange MtGox says it has found 200,000 coins worth $116 million in an old "digital wallet", after it collapsed in February admitting it had lost half a billion dollars in a possible theft. The Tokyo-based digital currency exchange filed for bankruptcy protection in Japan last month, saying it had lost 850,000 coins worth nearly $500 million at present prices. But 200,000 Bitcoins were left in a "wallet" used before June 2011, the company said in a statement on its website Thursday.

Dollar gains further on Fed rate expectations

The US dollar added to gains against the euro Thursday as fresh positive US economic data followed a slightly accelerated monetary tightening outlook from the Federal Reserve. At 2200 GMT the dollar was at $1.3779, compared to $1.3827 late Wednesday. The dollar edged higher to 102.42 yen from 102.32 yen, while the euro slipped to 141.14 yen from 141.53. The British pound fell to $1.6506 from $1.6536, while the dollar rose to 0.8835 Swiss francs from 0.8807.

Bitcoin's promise: a financial revolution the web's been waiting for

By Jeremy Wagstaff (Reuters) - Bitcoin may not be the messiah of a new currency its hardcore fans yearn for, but it may herald the deeper financial revolution the internet has been waiting for. While computers and smartphones have brought the web to more than a third of the world's population, online commerce still largely depends on a banking system that has changed little over recent decades, some of it relying on computer code written before the web was born.

British regulator fines trader over rigging UK bonds

British regulators on Thursday fined an ex-Credit Suisse trader for attempting to rig the price of government bonds in order to profit from the Bank of England's quantitative easing programme. Mark Stevenson was fined £662,700 ($1.1 million, 794,000 euros) for "deliberately manipulating" a government bond, or gilt, on October 10, 2011, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) said in a statement.

Asian shares slip after Yellen hints at rate hike

Asian markets slipped on Thursday after the head of the US Federal Reserve hinted that the central bank could hike interest rates earlier than expected. The comments from Janet Yellen followed an expected third successive cut in the Fed's quantitative easing (QE) stimulus programme, and took markets by surprise, boosting the dollar and sending Wall Street tumbling. Tokyo fell 0.62 percent, Hong Kong lost 0.56 percent, Sydney eased 0.68 percent and Seoul shed 0.85 percent, but Shanghai was 0.36 percent higher.

Loonie drops below 89 cents, U.S. Fed seeks to clarify when it might hike rates

TORONTO - The Canadian dollar fell heavily Wednesday to close below 89 cents US for the first time since mid-2009 as markets interpreted comments by the chair of the Federal Reserve to mean the U.S. central bank could raise interest rates sooner than thought. The loonie tumbled 0.86 of a cent to 88.93 cents US as the Fed reaffirmed its plan to keep short-term rates near zero but it no longer mentions a specific unemployment rate that might lead it eventually to raise rates. Instead, it will monitor a wide range of economic data before approving any rate increase.

U.S. taper to have 'limited' impact on Korea: finance ministry

SEJONG, March 20 (Yonhap) -- The U.S. move to further scale back its monthly bond purchases is within an expected range and that its impact on the Korean economy will be "limited," a senior finance ministry official said Thursday. The remarks by Deputy Finance Minister Eun Sung-soo came after the U.S. Federal Reserve decided to cut its monthly bond-purchasing program from US$65 billion to $55 billion starting next month. This marks the third time that the Fed has decided to taper its quantitative easing put in place to stimulate its economy by pumping money into the market.

Asian shares down after Yellen hints at rate hike

Asian markets fell on Thursday after the head of the US Federal Reserve hinted that the central bank could raise interest rates sooner than expected. The comments by Janet Yellen followed an expected third successive cut in the Fed's quantitative easing (QE) stimulus programme, and took markets by surprise, boosting the dollar and sending Wall Street tumbling. Tokyo dropped 1.65 percent, or 238.29 points, to 14,224.23, Sydney gave up 1.15 percent, or 61.6 points, to 5,294 and Seoul fell 0.94 percent, or 18.16 points, to close at 1,919.52.

Asian shares down after Yellen hints at rate hike

Asian markets fell on Thursday after the head of the US Federal Reserve hinted that the central bank could raise interest rates sooner than expected. The comments by Janet Yellen followed an expected third successive cut in the Fed's quantitative easing (QE) stimulus programme, and took markets by surprise, boosting the dollar and sending Wall Street tumbling. Tokyo dropped 1.65 percent, or 238.29 points, to 14,224.23, Sydney gave up 1.15 percent, or 61.6 points, to 5,294 and Seoul fell 0.94 percent, or 18.16 points, to close at 1,919.52.
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