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After resolving criminal probe, Halliburton still has incentive to cut deal in civil cases

NEW ORLEANS - Halliburton has resolved a Justice Department criminal probe of its role in the Gulf oil spill by agreeing to pay a $200,000 fine and admitting it destroyed evidence, but the company still has a powerful incentive to cut another deal with businesses and residents.

Halliburton admits destroying US oil disaster evidence

Halliburton, the US oil services giant, has admitted destroying evidence relating to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, the worst such disaster in American history. A Justice Department statement released late Thursday said the company had agreed to plead guilty to criminal conduct that occurred when it was carrying out its own post-accident investigation more than three years ago.

Halliburton admits destroying US oil disaster evidence

Halliburton, the US energy services giant, has admitted destroying evidence relating to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, the worst such disaster in American history. A Justice Department statement released late Thursday said the company had agreed to plead guilty to criminal conduct that occurred when it was carrying out its own post-accident investigation.

UPDATE 5-Transocean to pay $1.4 bln for role in BP oil spill

* Transocean owned doomed rig in 2010 Macondo disaster * Payment less than company set aside, shares jump 6.4 pct * Settlement still to be reached with plaintiffs * Halliburton still to settle with DoJ; its shares up 1.7 pct By David Ingram WASHINGTON, Jan 3 (Reuters) - Offshore rig contractor Transocean Ltd has agreed to pay $1.4 billion to settle U.S. government charges arising from BP Plc's massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. The settlement unveiled on Thursday by the U.S.
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