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Younger workers having hard time finding work and keeping jobs, new Labor Dept. study shows

WASHINGTON - Young adults born in the early 1980s held an average of just over six jobs each from ages 18 through 26, a Labor Department survey showed Wednesday. Since 1997, the department's Bureau of Labor Statistics has been keeping tabs on about 9,000 young men and women born in the early 1980s, surveying their educational and workplace progress. The latest survey is from interviews conducted in 2011-2012. According to the survey, more than two-thirds of the jobs held by high-school dropouts lasted less than a year.

Budget watchdog says little evidence of labour shortages, skills mismatch

OTTAWA - Canada is not experiencing significant job or skills shortages, says a new report from the country's budget watchdog that also takes a shot at a recent government analysis pointing to a growing problem. The findings by parliamentary budget officer Jean-Denis Frechette appear to once again put the office on a collision course with the Harper government, which had a series of public spats with predecessor Kevin Page. A spokesperson for Employment Minister Jason Kenney insisted there was no disagreement between the government and the PBO on labour shortages, however.

Long-term jobless face a dark future in U.S.: study

By Jason Lange WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The millions of Americans suffering through long stretches of unemployment could be left behind as the economy strengthens, a study by an influential former White House economist found. Alan Krueger, a respected labor market economist who led President Barack Obama's Council of Economic Advisers, said those unemployed long term tended to put less effort into their job hunts than others and were often viewed by employers as undesirable.

Senate jobless benefits plan poses problems: state agencies

By David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner said on Wednesday a U.S. Senate plan to extend long-term unemployment benefits retroactively "is simply unworkable" after a state officials group warned of implementation problems. The National Association of State Workforce Agencies said in a letter that some states may find the plan's verification requirements too costly and onerous, and could try to opt out.

British unemployment drops in pre-budget boost

British unemployment is falling and the number of people in work has struck a record high, official data showed on Wednesday, boosting the government ahead of its latest budget announcement. The number of unemployed fell by 63,000 people to 2.33 million in the three months to January, compared with the three months to October, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) announced in a statement. Employment jumped to 30.19 million in the same period, which was the highest level since records began in 1971, it added.

Spain's Rajoy meets with employers, unions to push dialogue

Madrid, Mar 18 (EFE).- Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy held a meeting Tuesday with representatives of business and organized labor to push for social dialogue and reactivate economic growth and job creation. Attending the meeting with Rajoy and Employment Minister Fatima Bañez were the heads of the CEOE employers confederation, Juan Rosell, and the CEPYME small-business association, Jesus Terciado, as well the chiefs of the CCOO and UGT labor federations, Ignacio Fernandez Toxo and Candido Mendez, respectively.

Boehner raises questions about Senate deal renewing benefits for long-term unemployed

WASHINGTON - House Speaker John Boehner said Friday he thinks a bipartisan Senate deal to renew expired benefits for the long-term unemployed isn't feasible, a remark that suggested the agreement is in trouble in the Republican-run House. Asked Friday by The Associated Press what he thought of the Senate compromise, he said, "You mean the one that can't be implemented?" Asked if his comment meant he didn't like the measure or that he wouldn't bring it to the House floor for debate, Boehner, R-Ohio, said, "I didn't say that."

Senators end long stalemate, reach bipartisan deal extending benefits for long-term unemployed

WASHINGTON - Bipartisan Senate bargainers ended a long-running election-season standoff and struck a compromise renewing expired jobless benefits for five months for more than 2 million Americans who have been out of work the longest, the lawmakers said Thursday. Approval of the $9.7 billion measure seemed likely by the Democratic-led Senate when it returns in late March from a weeklong recess. That would throw the issue into the Republican-run House, where its fate seemed uncertain.

Fed nominee Fischer says current policy is 'approximately appropriate'

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Reserve's policy stance is "approximately appropriate" and central bankers still don't have to adjust policies to ward off inflation, the Obama administration's nominee for a top position at the Fed said on Thursday. "We can focus on unemployment," Stanley Fischer, U.S. President Barack Obama's pick for the No. 2 spot at the Fed, told lawmakers at a confirmation hearing. He said the central bank would have to think about trade-offs between unemployment and inflation down the road, but that "we're not there yet."

Applications for US unemployment benefits fell last week to 3-month low of 315,000

WASHINGTON - The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits dropped 9,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 315,000, a sign the job market is picking up after a winter slump. The Labor Department said Thursday that the four-week average of applications, a less volatile figure, decreased 6,250 to 330,500, the lowest since early December. Applications are a rough proxy for layoffs. The declines indicate companies are confident enough about the economy to keep their staffs.
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