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Nothing should impede normalisation of Russia-West relations

President Vladimir Putin on Saturday said nothing should impede the normalisation of relations between Russia and the West, after ties hit a post-Cold War low due to the standoff over Ukraine. His remark, which contrasted with weeks of hostile rhetoric on both sides, came after talks between Russia, Ukraine and the West on Thursday in which an agreement was forged on initial steps to ease the crisis.

Special Report: How the U.S. made its Putin problem worse

By David Rohde and Arshad Mohammed WASHINGTON AND NEW YORK (Reuters) - In September 2001, as the U.S. reeled from the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Vladimir Putin supported Washington's imminent invasion of Afghanistan in ways that would have been inconceivable during the Cold War.

Special Report: How the U.S. made its Putin problem worse

By David Rohde and Arshad Mohammed WASHINGTON AND NEW YORK (Reuters) - In September 2001, as the U.S. reeled from the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Vladimir Putin supported Washington's imminent invasion of Afghanistan in ways that would have been inconceivable during the Cold War.

Obama's hope in check after Geneva deal

President Barack Obama had a curt assessment of his own administration's latest "breakthrough" in its tangled diplomacy with Vladimir Putin: buyer beware. US officials never held out much hope for talks in Geneva aimed at stemming the chaos in eastern Ukraine that Obama had blamed on Russian support for separatist rebels. But on the face of it, the unexpected agreement between Russia, Ukraine, the EU and United States appeared to address the immediate flashpoints of the latest brushfire in the wider Ukraine crisis.

4-way talks on Ukraine call for diplomatic solution

The United States, Russia, Ukraine and the European Union on Thursday adopted a joint statement aiming for a diplomatic solution over the ongoing crisis in Ukraine, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said. The four parties will continue talks, the Russian top diplomat said at a press conference. The talks were held among Lavrov, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Ukrainian Foreign Minister Andriy Deshchytsia, and EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton.

4-way talks on Ukraine call for diplomatic solution

The United States, Russia, Ukraine and the European Union on Thursday adopted a joint statement aiming for a diplomatic solution over the ongoing crisis in Ukraine, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said. The four parties will continue talks, the Russian top diplomat said at a press conference. The talks were held among Lavrov, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Ukrainian Foreign Minister Andriy Deshchytsia, and EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton.

'I hope not to use this right': Main points from Putin Q

Russian President Vladimir Putin fielded four hours of questions on Thursday in a marathon phone-in session, leaving the door open for Russian military intervention in Ukraine. Here are the main points from his comments: -On Russia sending troops to Ukraine "I remind you that the Federation Council (Russia's upper house of parliament) gave the president the right to use force in Ukraine. I hope very much that I will not have to use that right."

Confident Putin keeps all options open on Ukraine

Russian President Vladimir Putin exuded self-confidence as he fielded four hours of questions in his traditional phone-in marathon, keeping open Russia's diplomatic and military options on the Ukraine crisis. Putin basked in the glory of Russia's lightning takeover of Crimea from Ukraine last month, sitting impassively as dozens of locals in the Crimean port of Sevastopol chanted "Thank you!" in a live link-up.

Geneva talks on Ukraine aim for written 'solution': source

By Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - Four-party talks to resolve the crisis in Ukraine are working on a written document that will be published later on Thursday if the talks go well, said diplomats on the sidelines of the talks. "I know that they are working on a solution to the problem. They are working on something written," said a diplomatic source with knowledge of the talks said. "A document is being worked on," said a second diplomatic source said.

Putin says annexation of Crimea partly a response to NATO enlargement

MOSCOW (Reuters) - President Vladimir Putin on Thursday said Russia had been forced to respond to NATO enlargement and that its annexation of Crimea, home to its Black Sea Fleet, was partly influenced by the Western military alliance's expansion into eastern Europe. Putin said Moscow will respond if the United States moves ahead with plans to base elements of a missile defense shield in eastern Europe, accusing Washington of fuelling a Cold War-style arms race.
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