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Canada's Toyota workers poised to vote on joining union

By Susan Taylor and Solarina Ho TORONTO (Reuters) - Workers at Toyota Motor Corp's <7203.T> Canadian plants are set to vote next week on whether to become the first at wholly owned Toyota facilities in North America to unionize, a push Canada's biggest private-sector union is confident will succeed. A "yes" vote would mark a major victory for the union, Unifor, which has more than 300,000 members, including more than 39,000 in the auto industry, even though previous attempts to organize Toyota's Canadian plants failed.

Canada's Toyota workers poised to vote on joining union

By Susan Taylor and Solarina Ho TORONTO (Reuters) - Workers at Toyota Motor Corp's <7203.T> Canadian plants are set to vote next week on whether to become the first at wholly owned Toyota facilities in North America to unionize, a push Canada's biggest private-sector union is confident will succeed. A "yes" vote would mark a major victory for the union, Unifor, which has more than 300,000 members, including more than 39,000 in the auto industry, even though previous attempts to organize Toyota's Canadian plants failed.

Toyota recalls 124,050 Avalon sedans for airbag issue

DETROIT (Reuters) - Toyota Motor Corp <7203.T> said it was recalling about 124,050 Avalon large sedans globally, with most in the United States, to fix an electrical issue that may cause the front airbags to inadvertently deploy.

U.S. judge approves Toyota $1.2 billion settlement over concealing defects

By Nate Raymond NEW YORK (Reuters) - A U.S. judge signed off on Toyota Motor Corp's <7203.T> $1.2 billion settlement of criminal charges that it concealed safety problems in its vehicles, an accord that could serve as a model for a similar probe into General Motors Co <GM.N>. U.S. District Judge William Pauley approved the Japanese automaker's deferred prosecution agreement at a Thursday hearing in Manhattan.

Record $1.2B fine to settle US criminal probe signals relief for Toyota again pursuing growth

TOKYO - Toyota Motor Corp., headed to a record profit, can afford the $1.2 billion fine levied by the U.S. government for hiding information about defects in its cars. If anything, the settlement may even deliver relief for Toyota shareholders and customers as a sign the automaker has put the four-year recall debacle behind it.

Toyota to pay US $1.2 billion over defect cover-up

Toyota Motor Corp. will pay $1.2 billion to settle US criminal charges that it lied to safety regulators and the public as it tried to cover-up deadly accelerator defects. The Japanese auto giant eventually recalled 12 million vehicles worldwide in 2009 and 2010 at a cost of $2.4 billion as the scandal over sudden, unintended acceleration spread and tarnished its once-stellar reputation. Dozens of deaths were blamed on the defects which caused vehicles to speed out of control and fail to respond to the brake.

Toyota to pay US $1.2 billion for deadly defect coverup

Toyota Motor Corp. will pay $1.2 billion to settle US criminal charges that it lied to safety regulators and the public as it tried to cover up deadly accelerator defects. The Japanese auto giant eventually recalled 12 million vehicles worldwide in 2009 and 2010 at a cost of $2.4 billion as the scandal over sudden, unintended acceleration spread and tarnished its once-stellar reputation. Dozens of deaths were blamed on the defects.

Toyota to pay US $1.2 billion for deadly defect coverup

Toyota Motor Corp. will pay $1.2 billion to settle US criminal charges that it lied to safety regulators and the public as it tried to cover up deadly accelerator defects. The Japanese auto giant eventually recalled 12 million vehicles worldwide in 2009 and 2010 at a cost of $2.4 billion as the scandal over sudden, unintended acceleration spread and tarnished its once-stellar reputation.

Toyota to pay US $1.2 billion for deadly defect coverup

Toyota Motor Corp. will pay $1.2 billion to settle US criminal charges that it lied to safety regulators and the public as it tried to cover up deadly accelerator defects. The Japanese auto giant eventually recalled 12 million vehicles worldwide in 2009 and 2010 at a cost of $2.4 billion as the scandal over sudden, unintended acceleration spread and tarnished its once-stellar reputation.

AP source: US to announce $1.2B settlement with Toyota over its disclosure of safety problems

WASHINGTON - The U.S. has reached a $1.2 billion settlement with Toyota Motor Corp., concluding a four-year criminal investigation into the Japanese automaker's disclosure of safety problems, according to a person close to the investigation.
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