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Two British policemen sacked over 'Plebgate' scandal

London's Metropolitan Police force sacked two officers on Wednesday for their roles in the "Plebgate" scandal which led to the resignation of a government minister. Police constables Keith Wallis and James Glanville, who were both members of Scotland Yard's elite diplomatic protection squad, were sacked for "gross misconduct".

British press revels in royal arrival

Top-selling British newspaper The Sun on Tuesday changed its name to "The Son" to honour the arrival of a baby boy for Prince William and his wife Kate. The rest of Fleet Street marked the occasion with souvenir editions, with The Daily Telegraph, The Daily Star and The Daily Express all splashing the headline "It's a Boy" across front-page photographs of the new mother. The Sun, which carried a headline declaring that "the regal has landed" explained its name-change. "We've never changed The Sun's name before and we'll never do it again," it said.

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UK FOREIGN OFFICE WARNS ALL BRITONS TO LEAVE SOMALIA DUE TO "SPECIFIC THREAT" AGAINST WESTERNERS

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DEATH TOLL IN BRAZILIAN NIGHTCLUB FIRE LIKELY TO BE MORE THAN 200 - POLICE OFFICIAL

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ALGERIAN OIL MINISTER SAYS OPERATIONS WILL RESUME AT TIGUENTOURINE PLANT AT IN AMENAS AFTER TWO DAYS

Six nationalities among dead militants in Algeria - minister

ALGIERS, Jan 20 (Reuters) - Algeria's government said on Sunday the militants killed in the assault on the desert gas plant were from six different nationalities. The official APS news agency cited Communications Minister Mohamed Said as saying they were from Arab, African and non- African countries, without providing further details. The Interior Ministry said on Saturday 32 militants had been killed. It cited him as saying the operation to clear the Tiguentourine plant of mines laid by the militants was ongoing.

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CAMERON SAYS THREE OTHER BRITONS AND ONE BRITISH RESIDENT THOUGHT TO BE DEAD IN ALGERIA

Britain's top tabloid scolds Argentina over the Falklands

* Sun letter to the editor new salvo in diplomatic battle * Britain retained the islands 1982 Falklands War * Oil exploration raises stakes in sovereignty row By Hugh Bronstein and Estelle Shirbon BUENOS AIRES/LONDON, Jan 4 (Reuters) - Britain's biggest-selling newspaper had a simple message for Argentina in an editorial published on Friday in the South American country: "HANDS OFF" the Falkland Islands.
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