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Former U.S. test site sues nuclear nations for disarmament failure

By David Brunnstrom WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The tiny Pacific republic of the Marshall Islands, scene of massive U.S. nuclear tests in the 1950s, sued the United States and eight other nuclear-armed nations on Thursday, accusing them of failing in their obligation to negotiate nuclear disarmament. The Pacific country accused all nine nuclear-armed states of "flagrant violation of international law" for failing to pursue the negotiations required by the 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

Costa Rican 'miracle' woman was key to John Paul's sainthood

By Philip Pullella VATICAN CITY (Reuters) - Floribeth Mora Diaz does not care if people think she is crazy. She is convinced - and so is the Vatican - that she owes her life to a miracle cure because she prayed to the late Pope John Paul. "I have experienced the mercy of God in my own life and I am grateful," she told a news conference at the Vatican on Thursday explaining what Church investigators believe was a miracle attributed to John Paul's intercession with God.

'Miracle' woman honours saint-to-be John Paul II

The Costa Rican woman whose healing is the reason late pope John Paul II will be declared a saint on Sunday spoke with emotion about her trip to Rome, saying she would gladly travel the world with a message of hope. The Vatican has declared 50-year-old Floribeth Mora's apparently unexplained recovery from a brain aneurysm a miracle attributed to the Polish pontiff -- one of two required for the status of saint of the Catholic Church.

'Miracle' woman honours saint-to-be John Paul II

The Costa Rican woman whose healing is the reason late pope John Paul II will be declared a saint on Sunday spoke with emotion about her trip to Rome, saying she would gladly travel the world with a message of hope. The Vatican has declared 50-year-old Floribeth Mora's apparently unexplained recovery from a brain aneurysm a miracle attributed to the Polish pontiff -- one of two required for the status of saint of the Catholic Church.

From God.com to photography, Korea ferry founder has diverse interests

By David Chance SEOUL (Reuters) - The head of the South Korean family that operated the ferry which sank last week is a billionaire once jailed for fraud, a photographer who has held an exhibition at the Louvre under a pseudonym and the founder of a church which owns the website www.god.com. At other times in his chequered past, Yoo Byung-un, in his 70s, has been a bankrupt and an inventor of household and health-related devices. He was investigated and cleared of complicity in the suicides of 32 members of his church in 1987.

UK police ask Muslim women to help stop youngsters going to Syria

By Michael Holden LONDON (Reuters) - British police are asking Muslim women to dissuade young people in their communities from going to fight in Syria, the latest tactic by a European government worried about the security risk posed by youths radicalized by war.

Thousands mob India's Modi as election race starts in sacred city

By Frank Jack Daniel VARANASI, India (Reuters) - India's Narendra Modi received a hero's welcome from thousands of orange-clad supporters as he launched his election campaign on Thursday in the religious city of Varanasi, a show of strength for the Hindu nationalist tipped to be prime minister.

Indian Kashmir votes in shadow of violence

Indian Kashmir headed to the polls under the shadow of violent threats from militants on Thursday in the latest stage of the country's five-week election that sees 180 million people eligible to vote. Residents of India's financial and entertainment capital Mumbai also cast ballots, as did constituents in the electorally significant southern state of Tamil Nadu.

Former U.S. test site sues nuclear nations for disarmament failure

By David Brunnstrom WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The tiny Pacific republic of the Marshall Islands, scene of massive U.S. nuclear tests in the 1950s, sued the United States and eight other nuclear-armed countries on Thursday, accusing them of failing in their obligation to negotiate nuclear disarmament. The Pacific country accused all nine nuclear-armed states of "flagrant violation of international law" for failing to pursue the negotiations required by the 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

Prosecution looks into cult in ferry accident probe

INCHEON/BUSAN, April 24 (Yonhap) -- Prosecutors said Thursday they are tracking a flow of money from a mysterious religious group to the operator of a capsized ferry, as part of their widening investigation into the cause of the deadly accident. Prosecutors suspect that funds from members of the religious group, the Evangelical Baptist Church, were used in business operations of Cheonghaejin Marine Co. and Yoo Byung-eun, a billionaire man whose family appears to control the shipping company.
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