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Suicide bomber attacks university in Baghdad

A suicide bomber attacked a university in north Baghdad on Sunday, killing at least one person and wounding at least nine, security officials said. The attack, which comes as Iraq suffers a prolonged surge in bloodshed, occurred less than two weeks before a parliamentary election that will be a major test for security forces. Officials gave varying accounts of the attack on Imam Kadhim University. A police colonel said a suicide bomber entered the university before detonating explosives, while another bomber and a gunman were killed by security forces.

Kidnapped foreign journalists still held in Syria

Several foreign reporters remain captive in Syria, dubbed by a media watchdog as the most dangerous country for journalists, after four French colleagues were freed Saturday after 10 months in captivity. Thirteen major international news organisations, including the New York Times, BBC News, Reuters, The Associated Press and Agence France-Presse, said in December that more than 30 journalists were being held in the war-ravaged country.

Syria foreign fighters look to Western preachers

Foreign fighters in Syria are looking to Western-based spiritual authorities acting as "cheerleaders" on social media, a British-based research body said Wednesday. A study of the social media activity of foreign jihadists showed many were following certain influential preachers -- one from the United States and another from Australia, said the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) at King's College London university.

Jordanian jihadis returning from Syria war rattle U.S.-aligned kingdom

By Suleiman Al-Khalidi AMMAN (Reuters) - Jordanian Islamist Ahmad Mahmoud fought with rebels in Syria for six weeks earlier this year, then slipped back across the border to seek treatment for a war wound - even though the authorities had warned him not to return. Within a week the bearded 23-year-old fighter found himself in the dock at a military court, facing terrorism charges filed by authorities who are taking an increasingly tough stance against homegrown militants fighting in Syria's civil war.

Jordan destroys 'camouflaged' vehicles crossing from Syria

Jordanian warplanes destroyed "camouflaged" vehicles on Wednesday as they tried to cross into the kingdom from war-ravaged Syria, in the first such strikes since the conflict erupted three years ago. A Syrian military source, cited by state television in Damascus, said the vehicles struck did not belong to Syria's armed forces, while Amman said an initial probe showed they were being used by arms dealers.

Jordanian warplanes destroy vehicles trying to cross from Syria: spokesman

By Suleiman Al-Khalidi AMMAN (Reuters) - Jordanian warplanes hit and destroyed several vehicles trying to cross the border from Syria, a government spokesman said on Wednesday, underlining Amman's concern about incursions from areas controlled by Syrian rebels. A Jordanian security source said the targets appeared to have been Syrian rebels with machine guns mounted on civilian vehicles who were seeking refugee from fighting with government forces in southern Syria, but refused to elaborate.

Jordan says it destroyed combat vehicles crossing from Syria

Jordanian air force fighter jets destroyed a number of combat vehicles Wednesday as they tried to cross into the kingdom from war-ravaged Syria, the army said. A Syrian military source cited by state television in Damascus said, however, that the vehicles that were struck did not belong to Syria's armed forces. Damascus has accused Amman of backing the three-year uprising against President Bashar al-Assad by training and arming rebels, but Jordan denies this and says it has tightened its border and jailed dozens trying to cross it illegally.

Vehicles hit by Jordan air strikes not Syria army's

Vehicles hit by Jordanian air strikes on the border on Wednesday did not belong to the Syrian army, Syrian state media said, citing a military source. "No military or armoured vehicles belonging to the Syrian army moved towards the Jordanian border, and so what was targeted by the Jordanian air force does not belong to the Syrian army," state television said in a breaking news alert. The statement came after Jordan's army said air force fighter jets had destroyed a number of combat vehicles as they tried to enter the kingdom on Wednesday morning.

Syria says vehicles hit by Jordanian Air Force are not Syrian Army

BEIRUT (Reuters) - Syria said that several vehicles destroyed by Jordanian warplanes on Wednesday do not belong to the Syrian Army. "No vehicles belonging to the Syrian Army moved towards the Jordanian border and what was targeted by the Jordanian Air Force does not belong to the Syrian Army," Syrian state news agency SANA said, quoting an unnamed military source. A Jordanian security source said earlier that the targets were Syrian rebels in civilian cars mounted with machine guns.

Vehicles hit by Jordan air strikes not Syria army's

Vehicles hit by Jordanian air strikes on the border on Wednesday did not belong to the Syrian army, Syrian state media said, citing a military source. "No military or armoured vehicles belonging to the Syrian army moved towards the Jordanian border, and so what was targeted by the Jordanian air force does not belong to the Syrian army," state television said in a breaking news alert. kam-sah/dv
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