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Iraq attacks kill nine as election looms

Attacks in Baghdad and predominantly Sunni Arab areas of northern and western Iraq killed nine people on Friday, the latest in a surge of bloodshed ahead of a general election. The shootings and bombings, which also wounded dozens more, came with campaigning in full swing for the April 30 election and with violence at its highest level since 2008.

Election posters fill Baghdad as campaign starts

Campaigning for Iraq's April 30 general election opened Tuesday, with Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki bidding for a third term as his government grapples with the country's worst bloodshed in years. Iraqis face a long list of daily struggles, ranging from lengthy power cuts and poor running water and sewerage to rampant corruption and high levels of unemployment, to say nothing of a seemingly endless stream of attacks which have killed more than 2,200 people this year.

Election posters adorn Baghdad as campaigning under way

Campaigning for Iraq's April 30 general election opened on Tuesday, with Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki bidding for a third term as his government grapples with the country's worst bloodshed in years. Posters have gone up across Baghdad and around the country as candidates vie for one of 328 parliamentary seats. No single party is expected to win an absolute majority and previous elections have seen lengthy periods of government formation.

Iraq PM warns of poll delay after election chiefs quit

Iraq's premier warned Wednesday that April legislative polls may be delayed as he pushed for a controversial election law to be amended after electoral chiefs suddenly quit complaining of political interference. The electoral officials are pressing for the same reform to the law ahead of the April 30 vote, amid doubts the polls can in any case be held countrywide as anti-government fighters still control a city on Baghdad's doorstep.

Iraq PM warns of poll delay after election chiefs quit

Iraq's premier warned Wednesday that April legislative polls may be delayed as he pushed for a controversial election law to be amended after electoral chiefs suddenly quit complaining of political interference. The electoral officials are pressing for the same reform to the law ahead of the scheduled April 30 vote, amid doubts the polls can in any case be held countrywide as anti-government fighters still control a town on Baghdad's doorstep.

Pressure on Iraq election law after poll chiefs quit

Election officials pushed Wednesday for reform of Iraq's election law after polling chiefs suddenly handed in their resignations complaining of parliamentary and judicial interference, throwing next month's vote into disarray. Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki warned that failure to resolve the crisis could delay the general election and send Iraq into a "tunnel we might not be able to get out of".

Pressure on Iraq election law after poll chiefs quit

Election officials pushed Wednesday for reform of Iraq's election law after polling chiefs suddenly handed in their resignations complaining of parliamentary and judicial interference, throwing next month's general election into disarray. The surprise decision by the board of Iraq's Independent High Electoral Commission (IHEC) a day earlier came with doubts already swirling over whether the April 30 polls could be held nationwide, with anti-government fighters in control of a city on Baghdad's doorstep.

Iraqi journalist killed by Kurdish officer at Baghdad checkpoint

By Suadad al-Salhy BAGHDAD (Reuters) - An Iraqi journalist was shot dead by a Kurdish officer at a checkpoint in Baghdad on Saturday as he went to work, provoking protests by other journalists and a promise by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to arrest the perpetrator. Mohammed Badawi, the Baghdad bureau chief of Radio Free Iraq was on his way to the office near the Iraqi presidential compound in the center of the capital when the killing took place.

Iraq bill sparks fury over child marriage claims

A bill before Iraq's parliament that opponents say legalises child marriage and marital rape has sparked controversy ahead of elections as secular activists face off against the draft law's backers. The bill, the Jaafari Personal Status Law, sets out rules to do with inheritance, marriage and divorce. Supporters of the draft, named after a Shiite Muslim school of jurisprudence, say it simply regulates practices already existing in day-to-day life.

Iraq bill sparks fury over child marriage claims

A bill before Iraq's parliament that opponents say legalises child marriage and marital rape has sparked controversy ahead of elections as secular activists face off against the draft law's backers. The bill, the Jaafari Personal Status Law, sets out rules to do with inheritance, marriage and divorce. Supporters of the draft, named after a Shiite Muslim school of jurisprudence, say it simply regulates practices already existing in day-to-day life.
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