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Obama: religious violence has no place in US

President Barack Obama warned Monday that religious violence had no place in US society after a gunman with alleged anti-Semitic ties killed three people at a Jewish center and retirement home. "Nobody should have to worry about their security when gathering with their fellow believers. No one should have to fear for their safety when they go to prayer," Obama said at the White House, a day after the shooting in Kansas.

Obama: religious violence has no place in US

President Barack Obama warned Monday that religious violence had no place in US society after a gunman with alleged anti-Semitic ties killed three people at a Jewish center and retirement home. "Nobody should have to worry about their security when gathering with their fellow believers. No one should have to fear for their safety when they go to prayer," Obama said at the White House, a day after the shooting in Kansas.

Obama: religious violence has no place in US

President Barack Obama warned Monday that religious violence had no place in US society after a gunman with alleged anti-Semitic ties killed three people at a Jewish center and retirement home. "Nobody should have to worry about their security when gathering with their fellow believers. No one should have to fear for their safety when they go to prayer," Obama said at the White House, a day after the shooting in Kansas.

Obama: religious violence has no place in US

President Barack Obama warned Monday that religious violence had no place in US society after a gunman with alleged anti-Semitic ties killed three people at a Jewish center and retirement home. "Nobody should have to worry about their security when gathering with their fellow believers. No one should have to fear for their safety when they go to prayer," Obama said at the White House a day after the shooting in Kansas. col/pst

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