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Scrotum, Hitler, Facebook: Mexican state bans outlandish baby names

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - What's in a name? In northwestern Mexico, officials say potentially a lifetime of bullying, so parents in the state of Sonora can no longer opt to name their children Scrotum, Terminator, USNAVY or Facebook. The 61 banned names include technology-inspired monikers like Twitter and Yahoo, fictional characters Harry Potter, James Bond and Rambo and surgical terms like Circumcision. Children will also be spared being dubbed Virgin, Hitler, Email, Burger King, Christmas Day, Robocop and Rolling Stone.

Vietnam's hit game developer clips wings of Flappy Bird

The Vietnamese developer behind the smash-hit free game Flappy Bird has pulled his creation from online stores after announcing that its runaway success had ruined his "simple life". Technology experts say the addictive and notoriously difficult game rose from obscurity at its release last May to become one of the most downloaded free mobile games on Apple's App Store and Google's Play store. "'Flappy Bird' is a success of mine. But it also ruins my simple life. So now I hate it," the game's creator Nguyen Ha Dong tweeted.

Vietnam's hit game developer clips wings of Flappy Bird

The Vietnamese developer behind the smash-hit free game Flappy Bird has pulled his creation from online stores after announcing that its runaway success had ruined his "simple life". Technology experts say the addictive and notoriously difficult game rose from obscurity at its release last May to become one of the most downloaded free mobile games on Apple's App Store and Google's Play store. "'Flappy Bird' is a success of mine. But it also ruins my simple life. So now I hate it," the game's creator Nguyen Ha Dong tweeted.

Vietnam's hit game developer pulls plug on Flappy Bird

The Vietnamese developer behind the smash-hit free game Flappy Bird has pulled his creation from online stores after announcing that its runaway success had ruined his "simple life". Technology experts say the addictive and notoriously difficult game rose from obscurity at its release last May to become one of the most downloaded free mobile games on Apple's App Store and Google's Play store. "'Flappy Bird' is a success of mine. But it also ruins my simple life. So now I hate it," the game's creator Nguyen Ha Dong tweeted.

Filipino film highlights dangerous power of social media

By Alexandra Hudson BERLIN (Reuters) - A gay 15-year-old's heartbreak and obsession with the social media make for a gripping tale of how the Internet can drive fragile minds into a dangerous world, in the Filipino film "Unfriend" shown at the Berlin film festival.

Flappy Bird creator says popular game will fly no more

By Nguyen Phuong Linh HANOI (Reuters) - The developer of Flappy Bird, currently the most popular free mobile game on Apple App Store and Google's Android Play store, has announced that he is taking the game down at midnight (1700 GMT) on Sunday. Nguyen Ha Dong, a Hanoi-based game developer, announced the grounding of the addictive game in a Tweet at 1900 GMT on Saturday in which he also apologized to Flappy Bird players.

Twitter rides mobile wave in shifting Internet landscape

By Gerry Shih and Alexei Oreskovic SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Twitter Inc, whose stock has surged 150 percent since it went public in November, has a lot to live up to when it reports quarterly earnings for the first time on Wednesday. A growing number of naysayers warn that Twitter's stock is greatly overpriced, and that even mediocre inaugural results could deflate its soaring valuation, now several times that of its closest social media peer, Facebook Inc.

Freed by deal with government, Internet firms release new data on NSA surveillance requests

WASHINGTON - Freed by a recent legal deal with government lawyers, major Internet firms are releasing new data on how often they are ordered to turn over customer information for secret national security investigations. Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, Facebook and LinkedIn on Monday all unveiled new figures for the first six months of 2013.

Internet titans shine light on secret US requests

Internet titans eager to regain the trust of users for the first time on Monday provided insight into numbers of secret requests for user data made by the US government. Disclosures from Google, Facebook and others came a week after US authorities agreed to give technology firms the ability to publish broad details of how their customer data has been targeted by US spy agencies. The agreement came amid litigation from tech giants Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Microsoft and Yahoo.

Internet titans shine light on secret US requests

Internet titans eager tor regain the trust of users for the first time on Monday provided insight into numbers of secret requests for user data made by the US government. Disclosures from Google, Facebook and others came a week after US authorities agreed to give technology firms the ability to publish broad details of how their customer data has been targeted by US spy agencies. The agreement came amid litigation from tech giants Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Microsoft and Yahoo.
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