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Passengers on Vancouver-to-Edmonton flight warned to watch out for measles

EDMONTON - Health officials in Edmonton are warning passengers who arrived in the city on a flight from Vancouver this month that they may have been exposed to measles. The warning further extends to anyone who was in Edmonton International Airport during the hours immediately after the Air Canada plane landed on April 9. Alberta Health Services issued a news release Saturday stating that passengers and crew on Air Canada Flight 248, which departed Vancouver at 8:30 p.m. and arrived in Edmonton at 9:35 p.m. may have been exposed.

Ebola has killed 61 in Guinea since January

The Ebola virus has claimed 61 lives in Guinea out of 109 laboratory-confirmed cases since January, the government said Saturday. They were among 197 suspect cases recorded in the impoverished west African country. "From now on, biological analysis can be done more quickly, and the toll will no longer include any non-confirmed cases," government spokesman Damantang Albert Camara said in a statement.

Yoga may help women ease PTSD symptoms

By Shereen Jegtvig NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women enrolled in a small study reported a reduction in symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after a series of yoga classes. However, women in a comparison group that didn't take the classes also reported a similar decline in symptoms, researchers found. "The yoga group did well - they improved in their PTSD symptoms - and our control group actually did well, which we didn't expect," Karen Mitchell told Reuters Health.

No rift with top pathologist: Pistorius's lawyer

The pathologist hired by Oscar Pistorius will not give evidence at the athlete's murder trial because of scheduling issues and not due to any contradiction with the defence's case, one of the Paralympian's lawyers said Friday. Private forensic pathologist Reggie Perumal, who witnessed the autopsy of Pistorius' girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, told AFP Thursday he would not testify, sparking speculation that his decision was because his findings back key parts of the prosecution case. "That is not true!", Brian Webber, one of Pistorius's lawyers told AFP on Friday.

No rift with top pathologist: Pistorius's lawyer

The pathologist hired by Oscar Pistorius will not give evidence at the athlete's murder trial because of scheduling issues and not due to any contradiction with the defence's case, one of the Paralympian's lawyers said Friday. Private forensic pathologist Reggie Perumal, who witnessed the autopsy of Pistorius' girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, told AFP Thursday he would not testify, sparking speculation that his decision was because his findings back key parts of the prosecution case. "That is not true!", Brian Webber, one of Pistorius's lawyers told AFP on Friday.

Exclusive: Biogen prices hemophilia drug on par with older therapies

By Bill Berkrot (Reuters) - Biogen Idec Inc is pricing its newly approved long-acting hemophilia drug, Alprolix, to cost U.S. patients, and insurers, about the same per year as older, less convenient therapies whose price can reach about $300,000 annually. The move could pressure rivals such as Pfizer Inc to lower prices for existing hemophilia treatments, which provide patients with life-saving infusions of a blood clotting agent, according to doctors and industry analysts.

Lack of insurance tied to more emergency surgery: study

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The type of insurance people have is tied to their risk of needing emergency aorta surgery, according to a new study. Insurance, or lack thereof, is also linked to how well those people fare after surgery. Compared to people with private insurance, people without insurance were more likely to need emergency surgery on their aorta, the largest artery that supplies blood to every part of the body. They were also more likely to die or have complications after surgery.

FDA approves 2nd Merck tablet to reduce immune response to allergies, this time for ragweed

WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J. - U.S. regulators have again approved a Merck Ragwitek tablets dissolve quickly under the tongue. Patients are to take one daily, from three months before ragweed season begins until it ends, for a few years. The Food and Drug Administration approved it for patients aged 18 through 65. Whitehouse Station, N.J.-based Merck's tablet for spring grass allergies, Grastek, was approved Monday for patients aged 5 to 65. Both offer an alternative to medicines that just temporarily relieve symptoms or years of uncomfortable allergy shots.

Merck's ragweed pollen allergy drug gets U.S. approval

(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Merck & Co's pollen allergy drug Ragwitek. The tablet, which is administered by placing it under the tongue, is to treat the short ragweed pollen induced allergic rhinitis. (http://r.reuters.com/nyg68v) The approval for Ragwitek comes days after U.S. regulatory approval for Merck's grass pollen allergy drug Grastek.

FDA warns common uterine fibroid surgery can spread undetected cancer

(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned that a common surgical procedure used to remove uterine fibroids could spread undetected uterine cancer. Data showed that the procedure, laparoscopic power morcellation, could significantly worsen a patient's chance of long-term survival, the regulator said. (http://r.reuters.com/dug68v)
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