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FDA warns common uterine fibroid surgery can spread undetected cancer

(Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned that a common surgical procedure used to remove uterine fibroids could spread undetected uterine cancer. Data showed that the procedure, laparoscopic power morcellation, could significantly worsen a patient's chance of long-term survival, the regulator said. (http://r.reuters.com/dug68v)

FDA says device-assisted fibroid procedure may be spreading cancer in some women

WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration is warning women that a device-assisted procedure for treating fibroids could inadvertently spread cancer from the uterus to other parts of the body. The agency is discouraging doctors from performing the procedure, which uses an electronically powered device to grind and shred uterine tissue so it can be removed through a small incision in the abdomen. Known as laparoscopic power morcellation, the technique is widely used to treat painful fibroids, either by removing the noncancerous growths themselves or the entire uterus.

About 12 million U.S. outpatients misdiagnosed annually : study

By Curtis Skinner (Reuters) - Roughly 12 million adults who visit U.S. doctors' offices and other outpatient settings, or one in 20, are misdiagnosed every year, a new study has found, and half of those errors could lead to serious harm. The study by a team of Texas-based researchers attempted to estimate how often diagnostic errors occur in outpatient settings such as doctors' offices and clinics, as exact figures don't exist. The team's study will be published this month in the British medical journal BMJ Quality & Safety.

Long-term care: Why your location really matters

By Mark Miller CHICAGO (Reuters) - Location, location location: Not only is it key to the value of real estate, it's also a big driver of the cost of long-term care. A study of long-term care costs in the United States released this week shows that the cost of long-term services and support varies dramatically by location. For example, the national median cost of a private nursing home this year is $87,600 - but it's $155,125 in Connecticut, $87,180 in Ohio and $57,487 in Oklahoma.

West African Ebola outbreak caused by new strain of disease: study

By Saliou Samb CONAKRY (Reuters) - An Ebola outbreak blamed for 135 deaths in West Africa in the past month was not imported from Central Africa but caused by a new strain of the disease, a study in a U.S. medical journal said, raising the specter of further regional epidemics. The spread of Ebola from a remote corner of Guinea to the capital and into neighboring Liberia, the first deadly outbreak reported in West Africa, has caused panic across a region struggling with weak healthcare systems and porous borders.

Ebola virus circulating in Guinea is new strain

The virus that has caused a deadly Ebola epidemic in Guinea is a new strain that emerged locally, possibly transmitted by fruit bats, virologists have said. The outbreak is the first to be recorded in west Africa, but researchers said the virus causing it did not come from other countries where Ebola already circulates. An international team of scientists unravelled the genome of the virus and found it to be distinct from strains in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon, though they share an ancestor.

Malaysia quarantines 64 villagers over MERS virus

Malaysia has quarantined 64 people in a southern village after one of its residents become the country's first person to die of a respiratory illness that is spreading from the Middle East, local media reported Thursday. At least 71 people have died from the so-called Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, out of more than 200 infections in the worst-hit country, Saudi Arabia. The first fatality in Muslim-majority Malaysia -- a 54-year-old man -- died in hospital in the southern state of Johor on Sunday.

Malaysia quarantines 64 villagers over MERS virus

Malaysia has quarantined 64 people in a southern village after one of its residents become the country's first person to die of a respiratory illness that is spreading from the Middle East, local media reported Thursday. At least 71 people have died from the so-called Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, out of more than 200 infections in the worst-hit country, Saudi Arabia. The first fatality in Muslim-majority Malaysia -- a 54-year-old man -- died in hospital in the southern state of Johor on Sunday.

A year after marathon bombs, Boston hospitals apply lessons learned

By Svea Herbst-Bayliss BOSTON (Reuters) - The homemade bombs that ripped through the crowd at the finish line of last year's Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring 264, showcased the city's medical talent but also taught valuable lessons in responding to a mass disaster. By all accounts, Boston's hospitals performed well after the attacks on April 15, 2013. While many of the wounded lost limbs and a large amount of blood, all who made it to a hospital survived.

Off-season may not be enough for football players' brains

By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The time between football seasons may not be enough for players' brains to recover from hard hits to their heads during games and practices, suggests a new, small study. Researchers discovered changes in the white matter of 10 college football players' brains after one season, compared to people who didn't play sports. After six months of not playing, the athletes' brains were still different.
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