Connect to share and comment

U.S. official responsible for reforming Medicare is leaving post

By David Morgan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration on Tuesday announced the departure of the top health official responsible for reforming Medicare under President Barack Obama's healthcare reform law.

CBO slightly lowers U.S. deficit estimates as health subsidies fall

By David Lawder and David Morgan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Health insurance subsidies under the Affordable Care Act will cost slightly less than previously thought, helping to slow down the forecast growth of U.S. deficits over the next decade, the Congressional Budget Office said on Monday.

New York finalizes $8 billion Medicaid accord with federal government

By Edward Krudy NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York State said it finalized an agreement with the U.S. government on Monday allowing it to reinvest $8 billion of federal money in its health insurance system for low income people while avoiding potentially painful cuts or additional budget strain.

New York finalizes $8 billion Medicaid accord with federal government

By Edward Krudy NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York State said it finalized an agreement with the U.S. government on Monday allowing it to reinvest $8 billion of federal money in its health insurance system for low income people while avoiding potentially painful cuts or additional budget strain.

House Republicans approve Ryan budget that calls for big cuts to health programs

WASHINGTON - House Republicans rallied behind a slashing budget blueprint on Thursday, passing a non-binding but politically charged measure that promises a balanced federal ledger in 10 years with sweeping budget cuts and termination of health care coverage under the Affordable Care Act. The 219-205 vote on the budget outline takes a mostly symbolic swipe at the government's chronic deficits. Follow-up legislation to actually implement the cuts isn't in the offing. Twelve Republicans opposed the measure, and not a single Democrat supported it.

Data trove shows U.S. doctors reap millions from Medicare

By Sharon Begley and M.B. Pell NEW YORK (Reuters) - In 2012, south Florida ophthalmologist Salomon Melgen received $20.8 million in Medicare payments, the highest amount the government health plan for the elderly and disabled paid an individual provider that year, according to a Reuters analysis of federal data released on Wednesday. A California laboratory received $190 million, the most Medicare paid a single entity in 2012.

Factbox: Using the data on Medicare's payments to doctors

By Sharon Begley and M.B. Pell NEW YORK (Reuters) - Medicare billing data released by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) gives the public an unprecedented look at how the program pays medical providers. [ID:nL2N0N11FJ] But the data can lead to incorrect inferences about how much doctors and others are really making. Below are some of the caveats:

Diabetes expenses have decreased, but are still high

By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Out-of-pocket expenses for diabetes treatment have gone down for many U.S. patients over the past decade, according to a new study. But nearly a quarter of people with diabetes still face high expenses. In particular, "(out-of-pocket) expenses declined in the people with public insurance and in people with low income between 2001 and 2011," mostly because prescription drug costs went down, Rui Li told Reuters Health by email.

U.S. insurers still expect cuts in 2015 Medicare payments

By Caroline Humer (Reuters) - U.S. health insurers said on Tuesday they still expected cuts in government reimbursements for privately managed Medicare health plans for the elderly next year even after the Obama administration rolled back the steepest reductions. The government agency that oversees Medicare said late on Monday that on average, reimbursements to insurers for private Medicare plans would rise 0.4 percent, reversing what it said was a proposed cut of 1.9 percent.

Government raises Medicare Advantage payment estimate for 2015

The government has raised its payment estimate for Medicare Advantage plans, months ahead of a busy election season during which cuts to the program promise to be a key focus for politicians and voters. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said Monday that 2015 payments to the plans should increase less than 1 per cent overall. That compares to a drop of nearly 2 per cent that the government forecast in February. Analysts expect actual funding to fall, when many other variables are considered. But the drop shouldn't be as steep as they initially forecast.
Syndicate content