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Cycling: Bruyneel handed 10-year doping ban

The US Anti-Doping Agency on Tuesday banned Lance Armstrong's former sports director Johan Bruyneel from all sport for 10 years over his role in drug-taking in cycling. A US sports arbitration panel found Bruyneel, former US Postal team doctor Pedro Celaya and team trainer Jose 'Pepe' Marti guilty of multiple doping violations, the agency said. "The evidence establishes conclusively that Mr. Bruyneel was at the apex of a conspiracy to commit widespread doping on the USPS and Discovery Channel teams spanning many years and many riders," said a USADA statement.

Three staff linked to Armstrong doping get long bans: USADA

(Reuters) - Lance Armstrong's former cycling team manager Johan Bruyneel, doctor Pedro Celaya and trainer Jose "Pepe" Marti have all been handed long bans from sport for their involvement in doping, the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) said on Tuesday. Bruyneel was banned for 10 years, while Celaya and Marti got eight-year bans after the decision by the American Arbitration Association North American Court of Arbitration for Sport (AAA), USADA said in a statement.

Cycling: Armstrong probe findings due in a year, says UCI

An inquiry team probing the role of cycling's leaders in the Lance Armstrong doping scandal will deliver its report by next year, the head of the sport's global governing body UCI said on Wednesday. Brian Cookson, who won an ugly UCI leadership contest in September 2013 vowing to right past wrongs, said the three-member independent commission of inquiry had a crucial role and would publish its findings within 12 months.

Texas judge rules against Lance Armstrong over prize money

By Lisa Maria Garza DALLAS (Reuters) - A Texas judge has denied a request by lawyers for Lance Armstrong to block a sports insurance company from re-opening an arbitration agreement in which the firm paid $12 million in bonuses to the disgraced cyclist. Dallas County Judge Tonya Parker refused to stop the original arbitration panel from considering whether Dallas-based SCA Promotions should be able to recoup the millions it paid Armstrong during his Tour de France winning streak, according to court documents filed on Wednesday.

Dallas sports insurer wants prize money back from Lance Armstrong

By Lisa Maria Garza DALLAS (Reuters) - Lawyers for Lance Armstrong went to court in Dallas on Friday, to try to block a sports insurance company from re-opening an arbitration decision forcing the firm to pay $12 million in bonuses to the disgraced cyclist. Dallas-based SCA Promotions said that Armstrong lied for years about using performance-enhancing drugs and has sued to re-open the 2006 arbitration decision made before he finally admitted to doping.

Cycling: Rogers blames contaminated food for positive test

Australian triple world time-trial champion Michael Rogers claims contaminated food may have caused him to test positive for the banned substance clenbuterol, his Saxo-Tinkoff team said. World governing body the International Cycling Union (UCI) on Wednesday provisionally suspended Rogers and Belgian Jonathan Breyne over alleged doping offences. In a statement, the UCI said that clenbuterol was detected in a urine sample given by Rogers at the Japan Cup Cycle Road Race on October 20.

Verbruggen dismisses Armstrong allegations

(Reuters) - Former International Cycling Union (UCI) president Hein Verbruggen has dismissed claims by Lance Armstrong that he helped cover up a failed drugs test and says the disgraced American has made his life a misery. Armstrong suggested last month that in 1999 when the Texan was on his way to winning his first Tour de France title, Verbruggen had helped cover-up a positive drugs test for corticosteroids by backdating a prescription for saddle sore cream.

Cycling: Armstrong 'bought' Million Dollar Race - report

Retired Italian rider Roberto Gaggioli told Friday's edition of the Corriere della Sera that Lance Armstrong paid him $100,000 in 1993 in order to win the Million Dollar Race in the United States. "It was a young American colleague," Gaggioli, who is now 51, was quoted as saying. "He offered me a panettone (a traditional Italian Christmas cake) as a present and wished me a merry Christmas. In the box there were $100,000 in small bills. That colleague was Lance Armstrong.

Armstrong reaches settlement in one fraud case

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong reached a settlement on Wednesday in one of the fraud cases spawned by his confession that his Tour De France victories were fuelled by doping. Mark Kincaid, an attorney for Nebraska-based Acceptance Insurance, confirmed the company had reached a settlement with Armstrong but gave no details. The company sued Armstrong and the Tailwind Sports Corporation in March claiming the cyclist committed fraud by concealing his use of performance enhancing drugs during the 1999, 2000 and 2001 Tours.

Armstrong settles $3 million lawsuit over bonuses

(Reuters) - Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong has reached a settlement with an insurance company over $3 million in performance bonuses paid to him from 1999 to 2001, his spokesman said on Wednesday. Nebraska-based Acceptance Insurance had sued Armstrong and his former team's management company after the American cyclist was handed a life ban and stripped of his record seven Tour de France titles following a U.S. Anti-Doping Agency investigation.
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