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Cycling: Bitter race for cycling hot seat approaching finish

Months of shadowy politicking, allegations of corruption and the use of secret, damning dossiers will come to an end on Friday when the International Cycling Union (UCI) holds its presidential election. Barely a year after digraced American Lance Armstrong was banned for life for doping, cycling is about to elect a leader it hopes can pump fresh life into the sport and push it towards a doping-free future.

Cycling: Cookson vows doping amnesty if elected UCI chief

Brian Cookson, the International Cycling Union (UCI) presidential hopeful, has vowed if he is elected to offer cyclists an amnesty should they come clean about doping. British Cycling president Cookson is challenging incumbent UCI head Pat McQuaid for the presidency in next week's elections in Florence, during the World Championships.

'Grandpa' Horner becomes oldest Grand Tour winner

By Alasdair Fotheringham MADRID (Reuters) - American Chris Horner, nicknamed 'Grandpa' by his peers, created more than one landmark when he won the Tour of Spain on Sunday at the age of 41. Horner is the first rider from the United States to win cycling's third Grand Tour. Andy Hampsten won the Giro d'Italia in 1988 and Greg LeMond took the Tour de France in 1985.

Cycling: McQuaid confident of quick win in election

Cycling chief Pat McQuaid told AFP he is confident that now he has been cleared to be a candidate he will be re-elected easily as President of the International Cycling Union (UCI) later this month. The 64-year-old Irishman - who has been president for eight years - has faced a vitriolic assault on him since the other candidate Englishman Brian Cookson entered the race in early June. McQuaid has been attacked for many things including his handling of the Lance Armstrong doping scandal, which eventually saw the UCI strip the American of his seven Tour de France titles.

Lance Armstrong's lies revealed in new film

A film about Lance Armstrong's cycling comeback, shot in 2009 but shelved when his doping denials began to unravel, had its own revival Monday, offering fresh perspective on his lies. Academy Award-winning director Alex Gibney was granted unprecedented access to Armstrong and his entourage for an entirely different sort of film, prior to the cyclist's fall from grace. By the time the planned film was finished in 2010 it was "no longer relevant," Gibney said, in a turn of events that may have been fortuitous.

Lance Armstrong's lies revealed in Gibney film

A film about Lance Armstrong's cycling comeback, shot in 2009 but shelved when his doping denials began to unravel, had its own revival Monday, offering fresh perspective on his lies. Academy Award-winning director Alex Gibney was granted unprecedented access to Armstrong and his entourage for an entirely different sort of film, prior to the cyclist's fall from grace. By the time the planned film was finished in 2010 it was "no longer relevant," Gibney said, in a move that could turn out to be fortuitous.

IOC still to get back Armstrong's Sydney Olympic medal

By Karolos Grohmann BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) - Disgraced retired cyclist Lance Armstrong has yet to hand back his Sydney 2000 Olympic medal to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) nine months after he was stripped of it, officials said on Monday. The American lost his seven Tour de France titles last year and in January admitted to years of performance-enhancing substance use in the most spectacular drugs case in recent years.

Armstrong reaches settlement with Sunday Times

(Reuters) - Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong has reached an agreement with the Sunday Times after it had sued the drugs-tainted American for around one million pounds ($1.56 million), the British paper announced on Sunday. "It is the final episode in a long legal battle between this newspaper and the fallen icon..." the paper said. The newspaper was forced to pay Armstrong 300,000 pounds in 2006 to settle a legal case after it had questioned his Tour de France victories in an article published two years earlier.

Cycling: UCI chief McQuaid loses Swiss backing

International Cycling Union (UCI) president Pat McQuaid received a blow Wednesday to his bid to win a third term in the role as the Swiss Cycling Federation withdrew their backing for his candidacy. Irishman McQuaid had already seen his homeland remove their support for him but then thought he been granted a reprieve when the Swiss stepped in. But now he has lost their backing as well, he is left needing to change the rules in order to stand for election.

No positive tests in 2013 Tour de France: UCI

LONDON (Reuters) - The 2013 Tour de France had no positive drug test results, Cycling Anti-Doping Foundation (CADF) director Francesca Rossi said at a media Open Day in Aigle, Switzerland on Tuesday. Britain's Chris Froome won this year's race, which came under extra scrutiny as it was the first edition being staged since American Lance Armstrong admitted he had cheated his way to seven Tour de France titles from 1999 to 2005.
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