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Sports: World anti-doping body approves new code

Global anti-doping body WADA passed far-reaching new rules against the use of banned performance-enhancers Friday that doubles punishment for cheats as the sporting world still reels from cyclist Lance Armstrong's scandal. "The board... unanimously agreed to approve and to endorse the code," said outgoing World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) president John Fahey at a meeting in Johannesburg.

Sports: World anti-doping body approves new code

Global anti-doping body WADA passed far-reaching new rules against the use of banned performance-enhancers Friday that doubles punishment for cheats as the sporting world still reels from cyclist Lance Armstrong's scandal. "The board... unanimously agreed to approve and to endorse the code," said outgoing World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) president John Fahey at a meeting in Johannesburg. jcm/ak

Sports: World anti-doping body approves new code

Global anti-doping body WADA passed far-reaching new rules against the use of banned performance-enhancers Friday that doubles punishment for cheats as the sporting world still reels from cyclist Lance Armstrong's scandal. World sports leaders approved rules that ban first-time intentional dopers from competitive sport for up to four years -- automatic Olympics disqualification -- though some say the measures aren't tough enough.

Olympics: 'No positive so far' in Turin doping retests

Retests have found no positive doping results "so far" in athletes' samples taken during the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, the International Olympic Committee's medical commission chair told AFP Thursday. "So far we have no positive result from the retests," said Arne Ljungqvist, speaking on the sidelines of the World Conference on Doping in Sport. "We hope that it will be ready by the end of the year," he added. "We want to have it done before the Sochi Games so we don't have an overlap of testing to do."

Sports: World anti-doping body probes Sochi testing lab

Doping tests for next year's Winter Olympics in Russia and football World Cup in Brazil might be a foreign affair, as global doping policing body WADA hinted Thursday it is investigating the Moscow laboratory. Outgoing World Anti-Doping Agency president John Fahey confirmed "there is a matter that is being considered" about Russia's accredited anti-doping testing lab, three months after WADA revoked accreditation for Rio de Janeiro.

World sports bodies welcome stricter anti-doping rules

Global sporting bodies voiced wide support for more stringent punishment of athletes who use banned performance-enhancers as they discussed revised rules at a conference Wednesday. Delegates welcomed longer bans for athletes caught doping intentionally, which will pass from two years to four when the new anti-doping code comes into effect in 2015. But surprisingly powerful global athletics body the IAAF called for even harder crackdowns on culprits, signalling "clean" athletes frustrations that dopers sometimes go free amid low numbers of abnormal tests.

Athletics: Jamaica response 'positive'

Jamaica's government responded positively to a report into its anti-doping bodies following a massive doping scandal, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) said Wednesday. WADA director general David Howman said he met Jamaica sports minister Natalie Neita-Headley at the World Conference on Doping in Sport in Johannesburg Tuesday. "There has been a very positive response to the recommendations," he told journalists. "We are working closely to implement them."

Athletics: World doping body 'welcomes' Kenya inquiry

The global doping policing body gave a luke-warm welcome Wednesday to a Kenyan inquiry into doping allegations against its athletes, after criticism of a lack of action. "I welcome what appears to be some action," said World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) president John Fahey at a global conference against performance-enhancers in sports. Kenya named a 12-member task force on Monday to investigate a German media report that the blood-boosting drug EPO and other doping products were readily available to local athletes.

Overwhelming support for revised anti-doping code: WADA

By Mark Gleeson JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - The adoption of a revised World Anti-Doping Code received "overwhelming support" after intense discussions on Wednesday said WADA's president with the agency confident it will be ratified as planned on Friday. "There was overwhelming support for the direction in which the code is heading," World Anti-Doping Agency chief John Fahey said after the first full day of the World Conference on Doping in Sport.

Football: Brazil must help pay World Cup doping tests

Brazil has to foot part of the bill to fly World Cup footballers' blood and urine samples to Switzerland for doping tests, FIFA's chief medical officer told AFP Wednesday. The world footballing body will test samples in Lausanne after the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) revoked the accreditation of laboratories in Rio de Janeiro. "We will negotiate with the Brazilian government to contribute, because it is not the fault of FIFA," said FIFA's Jiri Dvorak.
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