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Former sprint cyclist Zabel admits to persistent doping

BERLIN (Reuters) - Former sprint cyclist Erik Zabel admitted on Sunday to years of doping, including EPO, cortisone and blood doping, days after he was named in a French Senate inquiry as a drugs offender. Until Sunday, Zabel, who was among the finest sprinters in his sport, had previously admitted to only a brief experimental week with the blood booster EPO in 1996.

Cycling: Tour chief rejects call for women's race

Tour de France director Christian Prudhomme rejected Friday a call from a leading British politician to stage a parallel women's version of the race next year. Harriet Harman, deputy leader of the main opposition Labour Party, wrote an open letter to Prudhomme last week urging him to look at staging a women's event at next year's Grand Depart, the opening stage of the tour, which is being staged in the northern English county of Yorkshire. Harman, who has campaigned for women's rights throughout her career, saw her letter to Prudhomme backed by a 70,000 strong petition.

Cycling: French EPO report no shock to Armstrong

Disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong said Thursday he was "not surprised" that 18 leading riders in the 1998 Tour de France have been named by the French Senate as having taken the blood-boosting agent EPO. The American said "virtually all of us" broke doping rules after the French Senate released a report saying 18 riders, including the top two finishers in the 1998 Tour, Italy's Marco Pantani and Germany's Jan Ullrich, had tested positive for EPO. An additional 13 riders were named as having suspicious samples.

Cycling: Mundane doping revelations a shock to no-one

When the names of the cyclists whose retroactively tested blood samples had come up positive for EPO became known, there was a palpable and collective sense of nothing new. There were no surprises, no scandalous revelations, no intrigue, no ambiguity. The results merely confirmed what was either already known or long suspected. Already, Jan Ullrich, after years of denial, had finally, belatedly come clean in June about his doping.

Pantani, Ullrich unveiled as EPO cheats by French drugs commission

Italian Marco Pantani and Germany's Jan Ullrich both used the banned blood-booster erythropoetin (EPO) during the 1998 Tour de France, a damning French parliamentary commission report said Wednesday. Pantani, who died of a cocaine overdose in 2004, won the controversial 1998 race, with Ullrich taking second place. The findings, which serve as concrete proof of cycling's dark past, identified a host of other EPO cheats, including top sprinters Erik Zabel of Germany and Italian Mario Cipollini.

Cycling: Pantani and Ullrich used EPO in 1998 Tour de France - report

Italian Marco Pantani and Germany's Jan Ullrich both used the banned blood-booster erythropoetin (EPO) during the 1998 Tour de France, a French parliamentary commission report said Wednesday. Pantani, who died of a cocaine overdose in 2004, won the controversial race, with Ullrich taking second place. The report identified a host of other riders who had cheated with EPO, including top sprinters Erik Zabel of Germany and Italian Mario Cipollini.

Cycling: Pantani and Ullrich used EPO in 1998 Tour de France - report

Italian Marco Pantani and Germany's Jan Ullrich both used the banned blood-booster erythropoetin (EPO) during the 1998 Tour de France, a French parliamentary commission report said Wednesday. Pantani, who died in 2004, won the controversial race, with Ullrich taking second place. The commission, though, found no hard evidence that American Bobby Julich, who was third, also used EPO, as Le Monde newspaper had reported Tuesday. The findings were based on comparisons made of retrospective testing results from 2004 and a list of anonymous samples from 1998.

Cycling: Top three at 1998 TDF resorted to EPO - Le Monde

Italian Marco Pantani, Germany's Jan Ullrich and American Bobby Julich who were the top three during the 1998 Tour de France were all taking the banned blood booster erythropoetin (EPO), according to reports published by French daily Le Monde on Tuesday. The revelations come just ahead of a French parlimentary commission who are set to release a report on Wednesday. The commission made waves on May 15 by announcing that senators from the upper chamber of parliament would reveal the identities of those riders using EPO during the race.

Doping: French committee on doping due to publish

A French parliamentary commission was on Wednesday due to make public its long-awaited report on doping in sport, possibly divulging the names of cyclists alleged to have taken performance-enhancing drugs during the 1998 Tour de France. The commission made waves on May 15 by announcing that senators from the upper chamber of parliament would reveal the identities of those riders using the banned blood booster erythropoetin (EPO) during the race.

Strict testing means cycling cleanest sport, says Froome

By Pauline Mevel PARIS (Reuters) - Stringent drug testing means cycling is now probably the cleanest sport, Tour de France champion Chris Froome said on Monday. Froome is the first rider to win the Tour since American Lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven titles for cheating and, perhaps unsurprisingly given cycling's drug-tainted past, the Briton found the finger of suspicion pointing at him during the race.
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